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Genetic influences in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a twin study.
Gut 2003; 52(8):1085-9Gut

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A number of families have been described which include multiple members with symptomatic, endoscopic, or complicated gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). First degree relatives of patients with GORD are more likely to suffer with GORD symptoms. These observations raise the possibility of a genetic contribution to the aetiology of GORD.

AIMS

To determine the relative contribution of genetic factors to GORD by evaluating GORD symptoms in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins.

METHODS

A total of 4480 unselected twin pairs, identified from a national volunteer twin register, were asked to complete a validated symptom questionnaire. GORD was defined as symptoms of heartburn or acid regurgitation at least weekly during the past year.

RESULTS

Replies were obtained from 5032 subjects (56% response rate). A total of 1960 twin pairs were evaluable: 928 MZ pairs (86 male pairs, mean (SD) age 52 (13) (range 19-81) years) and 1032 DZ pairs (71 male pairs, mean age 52 (13) (20-82) years). The prevalence of GORD among both groups of twins was 18%. Casewise concordance rates were significantly higher for MZ than DZ twins (42% v 26%; p<0.001). Multifactorial liability threshold modelling suggests that additive genetic effects combined with unique environmental factors provide the best model for GORD. Heritability estimates suggest that 43% (95% confidence interval 32-55%) of the variance in liability to GORD is due to additive genetic factors.

CONCLUSIONS

There is a substantial genetic contribution to the aetiology of GORD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Sandwell General Hospital, West Bromich, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12865263

Citation

Mohammed, I, et al. "Genetic Influences in Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Disease: a Twin Study." Gut, vol. 52, no. 8, 2003, pp. 1085-9.
Mohammed I, Cherkas LF, Riley SA, et al. Genetic influences in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a twin study. Gut. 2003;52(8):1085-9.
Mohammed, I., Cherkas, L. F., Riley, S. A., Spector, T. D., & Trudgill, N. J. (2003). Genetic influences in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a twin study. Gut, 52(8), pp. 1085-9.
Mohammed I, et al. Genetic Influences in Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Disease: a Twin Study. Gut. 2003;52(8):1085-9. PubMed PMID: 12865263.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Genetic influences in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a twin study. AU - Mohammed,I, AU - Cherkas,L F, AU - Riley,S A, AU - Spector,T D, AU - Trudgill,N J, PY - 2003/7/17/pubmed PY - 2003/9/17/medline PY - 2003/7/17/entrez SP - 1085 EP - 9 JF - Gut JO - Gut VL - 52 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: A number of families have been described which include multiple members with symptomatic, endoscopic, or complicated gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). First degree relatives of patients with GORD are more likely to suffer with GORD symptoms. These observations raise the possibility of a genetic contribution to the aetiology of GORD. AIMS: To determine the relative contribution of genetic factors to GORD by evaluating GORD symptoms in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins. METHODS: A total of 4480 unselected twin pairs, identified from a national volunteer twin register, were asked to complete a validated symptom questionnaire. GORD was defined as symptoms of heartburn or acid regurgitation at least weekly during the past year. RESULTS: Replies were obtained from 5032 subjects (56% response rate). A total of 1960 twin pairs were evaluable: 928 MZ pairs (86 male pairs, mean (SD) age 52 (13) (range 19-81) years) and 1032 DZ pairs (71 male pairs, mean age 52 (13) (20-82) years). The prevalence of GORD among both groups of twins was 18%. Casewise concordance rates were significantly higher for MZ than DZ twins (42% v 26%; p<0.001). Multifactorial liability threshold modelling suggests that additive genetic effects combined with unique environmental factors provide the best model for GORD. Heritability estimates suggest that 43% (95% confidence interval 32-55%) of the variance in liability to GORD is due to additive genetic factors. CONCLUSIONS: There is a substantial genetic contribution to the aetiology of GORD. SN - 0017-5749 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12865263/Genetic_influences_in_gastro_oesophageal_reflux_disease:_a_twin_study_ L2 - http://gut.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=12865263 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -