Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Vitamin C and risk of coronary heart disease in women.
J Am Coll Cardiol 2003; 42(2):246-52JACC

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Our objective was to prospectively examine the relation between vitamin C intake and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in women.

BACKGROUND

Results from prospective investigations of the relation between vitamin C intake and risk of CHD have been inconsistent. The lack of clear evidence for a protective association despite a plausible mechanism indicates the need to evaluate further the association between vitamin C intake and risk of CHD.

METHODS

In 1980, 85,118 female nurses completed a detailed semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire that assessed their consumption of vitamin C and other nutrients. Nurses were followed up for 16 years for the development of incident CHD (nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD).

RESULTS

During 16 years of follow-up (1,240,566 person-years), we identified 1,356 incident cases of CHD. After adjustment for age, smoking, and a variety of other coronary risk factors, we observed a modest significant inverse association between total intake of vitamin C and risk of CHD (relative risk [RR] = 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57 to 0.94). Among women who did not use vitamin C supplements or multivitamins, the association between intake of vitamin C from diet alone and incidence of CHD was weak and not significant (RR = 0.86; 95% CI 0.59 to 1.26). In multivariate models adjusting for age, smoking, and a variety of other coronary risk factors, vitamin C supplement use was associated with a significantly lower risk of CHD (RR = 0.72; 95% CI 0.61 to 0.86).

CONCLUSIONS

Users of vitamin C supplements appear to be at lower risk for CHD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. stavroula.osganian@TCH.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12875759

Citation

Osganian, Stavroula K., et al. "Vitamin C and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women." Journal of the American College of Cardiology, vol. 42, no. 2, 2003, pp. 246-52.
Osganian SK, Stampfer MJ, Rimm E, et al. Vitamin C and risk of coronary heart disease in women. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2003;42(2):246-52.
Osganian, S. K., Stampfer, M. J., Rimm, E., Spiegelman, D., Hu, F. B., Manson, J. E., & Willett, W. C. (2003). Vitamin C and risk of coronary heart disease in women. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 42(2), pp. 246-52.
Osganian SK, et al. Vitamin C and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2003 Jul 16;42(2):246-52. PubMed PMID: 12875759.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin C and risk of coronary heart disease in women. AU - Osganian,Stavroula K, AU - Stampfer,Meir J, AU - Rimm,Eric, AU - Spiegelman,Donna, AU - Hu,Frank B, AU - Manson,JoAnn E, AU - Willett,Walter C, PY - 2003/7/24/pubmed PY - 2003/8/21/medline PY - 2003/7/24/entrez SP - 246 EP - 52 JF - Journal of the American College of Cardiology JO - J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. VL - 42 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Our objective was to prospectively examine the relation between vitamin C intake and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in women. BACKGROUND: Results from prospective investigations of the relation between vitamin C intake and risk of CHD have been inconsistent. The lack of clear evidence for a protective association despite a plausible mechanism indicates the need to evaluate further the association between vitamin C intake and risk of CHD. METHODS: In 1980, 85,118 female nurses completed a detailed semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire that assessed their consumption of vitamin C and other nutrients. Nurses were followed up for 16 years for the development of incident CHD (nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD). RESULTS: During 16 years of follow-up (1,240,566 person-years), we identified 1,356 incident cases of CHD. After adjustment for age, smoking, and a variety of other coronary risk factors, we observed a modest significant inverse association between total intake of vitamin C and risk of CHD (relative risk [RR] = 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57 to 0.94). Among women who did not use vitamin C supplements or multivitamins, the association between intake of vitamin C from diet alone and incidence of CHD was weak and not significant (RR = 0.86; 95% CI 0.59 to 1.26). In multivariate models adjusting for age, smoking, and a variety of other coronary risk factors, vitamin C supplement use was associated with a significantly lower risk of CHD (RR = 0.72; 95% CI 0.61 to 0.86). CONCLUSIONS: Users of vitamin C supplements appear to be at lower risk for CHD. SN - 0735-1097 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12875759/Vitamin_C_and_risk_of_coronary_heart_disease_in_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0735109703005758 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -