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Blockage of the lacrimal drainage apparatus as a side effect of docetaxel therapy.
Cancer. 2003 Aug 01; 98(3):504-7.C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The current study was conducted to report the severity and management of canalicular and nasolacrimal duct stenosis as a side effect of docetaxel therapy and to report the outcomes of surgical intervention for this condition.

METHODS

The records of 148 patients with epiphora associated with docetaxel therapy who were evaluated at the Ophthalmology Service at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center were reviewed. The frequency of docetaxel administration, the dose intensity, the cumulative dose of docetaxel, and any concomitant chemotherapeutic agents were recorded. Each patient underwent an ophthalmologic examination and in-office probing and irrigation. The patients either were treated with topical steroids or offered a surgical procedure for canalicular stenosis- (silicone intubation, dacryocystorhinostomy [DCR] with the placement of silicone tubes, or DCR with the placement of Pyrex glass tubes), depending on the severity of the canalicular stenosis.

RESULTS

Docetaxel was given weekly in 71 patients, every 2 weeks in 5 patients, and every 3 weeks in 72 patients. Thirty patients (59 eyes) who received weekly docetaxel underwent surgery to correct epiphora. Twenty-three patients (39 eyes) were treated with temporary silicone tube placement, 9 patients (13 eyes) were treated with DCR with temporary silicone tube placement, and 4 patients (7 eyes) were treated with DCR with permanent Pyrex glass tube placement. Twenty-nine of the 30 patients who underwent surgery reported improvement or total resolution of epiphora after the procedure. Ten additional patients (20 eyes) who received weekly docetaxel had complete closure of their canaliculi but elected not to undergo surgery. Of special note were two patients who received weekly docetaxel in the neoadjuvant setting and developed complete closure of the canaliculi. Of the patients who received docetaxel every 2 or 3 weeks, only 3 required a surgical intervention to correct epiphora; none required Pyrex glass tube placement.

CONCLUSIONS

Canalicular and nasolacrimal duct obstruction is a common side effect of weekly docetaxel therapy and can occur even when this drug is used in the neoadjuvant setting. The results of the current study indicate that early temporary silicone intubation in symptomatic patients receiving weekly docetaxel can prevent further closure of the lacrimal drainage apparatus and obviate more involved surgical interventions and permanent Pyrex glass tube placement. Cancer 2003;98:504-7.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Ophthalmology, Department of Plastic Surgery, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. besmaeli@mdanderson.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12879466

Citation

Esmaeli, Bita, et al. "Blockage of the Lacrimal Drainage Apparatus as a Side Effect of Docetaxel Therapy." Cancer, vol. 98, no. 3, 2003, pp. 504-7.
Esmaeli B, Hidaji L, Adinin RB, et al. Blockage of the lacrimal drainage apparatus as a side effect of docetaxel therapy. Cancer. 2003;98(3):504-7.
Esmaeli, B., Hidaji, L., Adinin, R. B., Faustina, M., Coats, C., Arbuckle, R., Rivera, E., Valero, V., Tu, S. M., & Ahmadi, M. A. (2003). Blockage of the lacrimal drainage apparatus as a side effect of docetaxel therapy. Cancer, 98(3), 504-7.
Esmaeli B, et al. Blockage of the Lacrimal Drainage Apparatus as a Side Effect of Docetaxel Therapy. Cancer. 2003 Aug 1;98(3):504-7. PubMed PMID: 12879466.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Blockage of the lacrimal drainage apparatus as a side effect of docetaxel therapy. AU - Esmaeli,Bita, AU - Hidaji,Lillie, AU - Adinin,Rosnie B, AU - Faustina,Misha, AU - Coats,Carol, AU - Arbuckle,Rebecca, AU - Rivera,Edgardo, AU - Valero,Vicente, AU - Tu,Shi-Ming, AU - Ahmadi,M Amir, PY - 2003/7/25/pubmed PY - 2003/8/15/medline PY - 2003/7/25/entrez SP - 504 EP - 7 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 98 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The current study was conducted to report the severity and management of canalicular and nasolacrimal duct stenosis as a side effect of docetaxel therapy and to report the outcomes of surgical intervention for this condition. METHODS: The records of 148 patients with epiphora associated with docetaxel therapy who were evaluated at the Ophthalmology Service at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center were reviewed. The frequency of docetaxel administration, the dose intensity, the cumulative dose of docetaxel, and any concomitant chemotherapeutic agents were recorded. Each patient underwent an ophthalmologic examination and in-office probing and irrigation. The patients either were treated with topical steroids or offered a surgical procedure for canalicular stenosis- (silicone intubation, dacryocystorhinostomy [DCR] with the placement of silicone tubes, or DCR with the placement of Pyrex glass tubes), depending on the severity of the canalicular stenosis. RESULTS: Docetaxel was given weekly in 71 patients, every 2 weeks in 5 patients, and every 3 weeks in 72 patients. Thirty patients (59 eyes) who received weekly docetaxel underwent surgery to correct epiphora. Twenty-three patients (39 eyes) were treated with temporary silicone tube placement, 9 patients (13 eyes) were treated with DCR with temporary silicone tube placement, and 4 patients (7 eyes) were treated with DCR with permanent Pyrex glass tube placement. Twenty-nine of the 30 patients who underwent surgery reported improvement or total resolution of epiphora after the procedure. Ten additional patients (20 eyes) who received weekly docetaxel had complete closure of their canaliculi but elected not to undergo surgery. Of special note were two patients who received weekly docetaxel in the neoadjuvant setting and developed complete closure of the canaliculi. Of the patients who received docetaxel every 2 or 3 weeks, only 3 required a surgical intervention to correct epiphora; none required Pyrex glass tube placement. CONCLUSIONS: Canalicular and nasolacrimal duct obstruction is a common side effect of weekly docetaxel therapy and can occur even when this drug is used in the neoadjuvant setting. The results of the current study indicate that early temporary silicone intubation in symptomatic patients receiving weekly docetaxel can prevent further closure of the lacrimal drainage apparatus and obviate more involved surgical interventions and permanent Pyrex glass tube placement. Cancer 2003;98:504-7. SN - 0008-543X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12879466/Blockage_of_the_lacrimal_drainage_apparatus_as_a_side_effect_of_docetaxel_therapy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.11527 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -