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Associations of lead biomarkers with renal function in Korean lead workers.
Occup Environ Med. 2003 Aug; 60(8):551-62.OE

Abstract

AIMS

To compare associations of lead biomarkers with renal function in current and former lead workers.

METHODS

Cross sectional analysis of first year results from a longitudinal study of 803 lead workers and 135 controls in South Korea. Clinical renal function was assessed by blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine, and measured and calculated creatinine clearance. Urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and retinol-binding protein were also measured.

RESULTS

Mean (SD) tibia lead, blood lead, and DMSA chelatable lead levels in lead workers were 37.2 (40.4) micro g/g bone mineral, 32.0 (15.0) micro g/dl, and 767.8 (862.1) micro g/g creatinine, respectively. Higher lead measures were associated with worse renal function in 16/42 models. When influential outliers were removed, higher lead measures remained associated with worse renal function in nine models. An additional five associations were in the opposite direction. Effect modification by age was observed. In 3/16 models, associations between higher lead measures and worse clinical renal function in participants in the oldest age tertile were significantly different from associations in those in the youngest age tertile which were in the opposite direction. Mean urinary cadmium (CdU) was 1.1 micro g/g creatinine (n = 191). Higher CdU levels were associated with higher NAG.

CONCLUSIONS

These data suggest that lead has an adverse effect on renal function in the moderate dose range, particularly in older workers. Associations between higher lead measures and lower BUN and serum creatinine and higher creatinine clearances may represent lead induced hyperfiltration. Environmental cadmium may also have an adverse renal impact, at least on NAG.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12883015

Citation

Weaver, V M., et al. "Associations of Lead Biomarkers With Renal Function in Korean Lead Workers." Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol. 60, no. 8, 2003, pp. 551-62.
Weaver VM, Lee BK, Ahn KD, et al. Associations of lead biomarkers with renal function in Korean lead workers. Occup Environ Med. 2003;60(8):551-62.
Weaver, V. M., Lee, B. K., Ahn, K. D., Lee, G. S., Todd, A. C., Stewart, W. F., Wen, J., Simon, D. J., Parsons, P. J., & Schwartz, B. S. (2003). Associations of lead biomarkers with renal function in Korean lead workers. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 60(8), 551-62.
Weaver VM, et al. Associations of Lead Biomarkers With Renal Function in Korean Lead Workers. Occup Environ Med. 2003;60(8):551-62. PubMed PMID: 12883015.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of lead biomarkers with renal function in Korean lead workers. AU - Weaver,V M, AU - Lee,B-K, AU - Ahn,K-D, AU - Lee,G-S, AU - Todd,A C, AU - Stewart,W F, AU - Wen,J, AU - Simon,D J, AU - Parsons,P J, AU - Schwartz,B S, PY - 2003/7/29/pubmed PY - 2003/9/23/medline PY - 2003/7/29/entrez SP - 551 EP - 62 JF - Occupational and environmental medicine JO - Occup Environ Med VL - 60 IS - 8 N2 - AIMS: To compare associations of lead biomarkers with renal function in current and former lead workers. METHODS: Cross sectional analysis of first year results from a longitudinal study of 803 lead workers and 135 controls in South Korea. Clinical renal function was assessed by blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine, and measured and calculated creatinine clearance. Urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and retinol-binding protein were also measured. RESULTS: Mean (SD) tibia lead, blood lead, and DMSA chelatable lead levels in lead workers were 37.2 (40.4) micro g/g bone mineral, 32.0 (15.0) micro g/dl, and 767.8 (862.1) micro g/g creatinine, respectively. Higher lead measures were associated with worse renal function in 16/42 models. When influential outliers were removed, higher lead measures remained associated with worse renal function in nine models. An additional five associations were in the opposite direction. Effect modification by age was observed. In 3/16 models, associations between higher lead measures and worse clinical renal function in participants in the oldest age tertile were significantly different from associations in those in the youngest age tertile which were in the opposite direction. Mean urinary cadmium (CdU) was 1.1 micro g/g creatinine (n = 191). Higher CdU levels were associated with higher NAG. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that lead has an adverse effect on renal function in the moderate dose range, particularly in older workers. Associations between higher lead measures and lower BUN and serum creatinine and higher creatinine clearances may represent lead induced hyperfiltration. Environmental cadmium may also have an adverse renal impact, at least on NAG. SN - 1351-0711 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12883015/Associations_of_lead_biomarkers_with_renal_function_in_Korean_lead_workers_ L2 - http://oem.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=12883015 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -