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Vitamin E treatment for tardive dyskinesia. Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study #394 Study Group.
Arch Gen Psychiatry 1999; 56(9):836-41AG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several short-term, controlled trials have documented the efficacy of vitamin E in treating tardive dyskinesia. However, the persistent nature of the disease prompted us to perform a multicenter, longer-term trial of vitamin E.

METHODS

The study was a prospective, randomized, 9-site trial of up to 2 years of treatment with d-vitamin E (1600 IU/d) vs matching placebo. One hundred fifty-eight subjects with tardive dyskinesia who were receiving neuroleptic medications were enrolled. The blinded assessments performed were clinical (Abnormal Involuntary Movements Scale, Barnes Akathisia Scale, and Modified Simpson-Angus [for Extrapyramidal Symptoms] Scale) and electromechanical assessments of movement disorders, psychiatric status (Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale), and functioning (Global Assessment of Functioning). There were no significant differences in baseline demographic characteristics or in study assessments between the group that received vitamin E and the group that received placebo.

RESULTS

Vitamin E was well tolerated and subject compliance with medication was good and similar between treatment groups. One hundred seven subjects (70% of those receiving vitamin E and 66% of subjects receiving placebo) completed at least 1 year of treatment. There were no significant effects of vitamin E on total scores or subscale scores for the AIMS, electromechanical measures of dyskinesia, or scores from the other 4 scales.

CONCLUSION

This long-term, randomized trial of vitamin E vs placebo found no evidence for efficacy of vitamin E in the treatment of tardive dyskinesia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Psychiatry Service, New York Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, NY 10010, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12892048

Citation

Adler, L A., et al. "Vitamin E Treatment for Tardive Dyskinesia. Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study #394 Study Group." Archives of General Psychiatry, vol. 56, no. 9, 1999, pp. 836-41.
Adler LA, Rotrosen J, Edson R, et al. Vitamin E treatment for tardive dyskinesia. Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study #394 Study Group. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1999;56(9):836-41.
Adler, L. A., Rotrosen, J., Edson, R., Lavori, P., Lohr, J., Hitzemann, R., ... Tracy, K. (1999). Vitamin E treatment for tardive dyskinesia. Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study #394 Study Group. Archives of General Psychiatry, 56(9), pp. 836-41.
Adler LA, et al. Vitamin E Treatment for Tardive Dyskinesia. Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study #394 Study Group. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1999;56(9):836-41. PubMed PMID: 12892048.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin E treatment for tardive dyskinesia. Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study #394 Study Group. AU - Adler,L A, AU - Rotrosen,J, AU - Edson,R, AU - Lavori,P, AU - Lohr,J, AU - Hitzemann,R, AU - Raisch,D, AU - Caligiuri,M, AU - Tracy,K, PY - 2003/8/2/pubmed PY - 2003/8/2/medline PY - 2003/8/2/entrez SP - 836 EP - 41 JF - Archives of general psychiatry JO - Arch. Gen. Psychiatry VL - 56 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Several short-term, controlled trials have documented the efficacy of vitamin E in treating tardive dyskinesia. However, the persistent nature of the disease prompted us to perform a multicenter, longer-term trial of vitamin E. METHODS: The study was a prospective, randomized, 9-site trial of up to 2 years of treatment with d-vitamin E (1600 IU/d) vs matching placebo. One hundred fifty-eight subjects with tardive dyskinesia who were receiving neuroleptic medications were enrolled. The blinded assessments performed were clinical (Abnormal Involuntary Movements Scale, Barnes Akathisia Scale, and Modified Simpson-Angus [for Extrapyramidal Symptoms] Scale) and electromechanical assessments of movement disorders, psychiatric status (Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale), and functioning (Global Assessment of Functioning). There were no significant differences in baseline demographic characteristics or in study assessments between the group that received vitamin E and the group that received placebo. RESULTS: Vitamin E was well tolerated and subject compliance with medication was good and similar between treatment groups. One hundred seven subjects (70% of those receiving vitamin E and 66% of subjects receiving placebo) completed at least 1 year of treatment. There were no significant effects of vitamin E on total scores or subscale scores for the AIMS, electromechanical measures of dyskinesia, or scores from the other 4 scales. CONCLUSION: This long-term, randomized trial of vitamin E vs placebo found no evidence for efficacy of vitamin E in the treatment of tardive dyskinesia. SN - 0003-990X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12892048/Vitamin_E_treatment_for_tardive_dyskinesia__Veterans_Affairs_Cooperative_Study_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=12892048.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -