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Protection from solar simulated radiation-induced DNA damage in cultured human fibroblasts by three commercially available sunscreens.
Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2003 Jul; 81(7):690-5.CJ

Abstract

Exposure to solar radiation can produce both acute and chronic changes in the skin, including sunburn, edema, immunosuppression, premature skin aging, and skin cancer. At the cellular level, solar radiation can produce adverse structural and functional changes in membrane proteins and lipids and in chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA. The increasing awareness of these adverse effects has led the public to demand better photoprotection. In this study, the alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate the photoprotective effects of three commercially available sunscreens at sun protection factors (SPF) 15 and 30. Human fibroblasts were used as target cells to conveniently study the effects of solar simulated radiation on DNA damage in the presence and absence of sunscreens. When human fibroblasts were exposed to various doses of solar simulated radiation, DNA damage, as measured in sunscreen-protected cells by the comet assay, was not significantly different from that detected in unexposed cells. At 1.0 and 1.5 minimal erythemal doses (MED), all sunscreens, at both SPF 15 and 30, provided nearly 100% photoprotection to the fibroblasts. Further studies are required to elucidate the role of UVA in the production and repair of DNA damage in cells exposed to sunlight.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau, Product Safety Programme, Health Canada, 775 Brookfield Road, Ottawa, ON K1A 1C1, Canada. Pascale_Reinhardt@hc-sc.gc.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12897816

Citation

Reinhardt, Pascale, et al. "Protection From Solar Simulated Radiation-induced DNA Damage in Cultured Human Fibroblasts By Three Commercially Available Sunscreens." Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, vol. 81, no. 7, 2003, pp. 690-5.
Reinhardt P, Cybulski M, McNamee JP, et al. Protection from solar simulated radiation-induced DNA damage in cultured human fibroblasts by three commercially available sunscreens. Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2003;81(7):690-5.
Reinhardt, P., Cybulski, M., McNamee, J. P., McLean, J. R., Gorman, W., & Deslauriers, Y. (2003). Protection from solar simulated radiation-induced DNA damage in cultured human fibroblasts by three commercially available sunscreens. Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, 81(7), 690-5.
Reinhardt P, et al. Protection From Solar Simulated Radiation-induced DNA Damage in Cultured Human Fibroblasts By Three Commercially Available Sunscreens. Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2003;81(7):690-5. PubMed PMID: 12897816.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Protection from solar simulated radiation-induced DNA damage in cultured human fibroblasts by three commercially available sunscreens. AU - Reinhardt,Pascale, AU - Cybulski,Michelle, AU - McNamee,James P, AU - McLean,Jack R, AU - Gorman,Wayne, AU - Deslauriers,Yvon, PY - 2003/8/5/pubmed PY - 2004/3/23/medline PY - 2003/8/5/entrez SP - 690 EP - 5 JF - Canadian journal of physiology and pharmacology JO - Can J Physiol Pharmacol VL - 81 IS - 7 N2 - Exposure to solar radiation can produce both acute and chronic changes in the skin, including sunburn, edema, immunosuppression, premature skin aging, and skin cancer. At the cellular level, solar radiation can produce adverse structural and functional changes in membrane proteins and lipids and in chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA. The increasing awareness of these adverse effects has led the public to demand better photoprotection. In this study, the alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate the photoprotective effects of three commercially available sunscreens at sun protection factors (SPF) 15 and 30. Human fibroblasts were used as target cells to conveniently study the effects of solar simulated radiation on DNA damage in the presence and absence of sunscreens. When human fibroblasts were exposed to various doses of solar simulated radiation, DNA damage, as measured in sunscreen-protected cells by the comet assay, was not significantly different from that detected in unexposed cells. At 1.0 and 1.5 minimal erythemal doses (MED), all sunscreens, at both SPF 15 and 30, provided nearly 100% photoprotection to the fibroblasts. Further studies are required to elucidate the role of UVA in the production and repair of DNA damage in cells exposed to sunlight. SN - 0008-4212 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12897816/Protection_from_solar_simulated_radiation_induced_DNA_damage_in_cultured_human_fibroblasts_by_three_commercially_available_sunscreens_ L2 - https://cdnsciencepub.com/doi/10.1139/y03-062?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -