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Malaria prophylaxis: taking aim at constantly moving targets.
Yale J Biol Med. 1992 Jul-Aug; 65(4):329-36.YJ

Abstract

The prevention of malaria infections is one of the most important functions that any clinician can perform for those traveling to tropical geographic regions where malaria risks are present. The prophylaxis question has become complicated by continued emergence of chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum, the recent appearance of Plasmodium vivax resistance, and the availability of a wide choice of antimalarial pharmaceuticals. Chemoprophylaxis may produce different toxicities among various patient populations. With increasing numbers of women who travel during their professional lives, there are potential implications for using chemoprophylaxis during pregnancy. Children are unable to tolerate certain antimalarials because of toxicities unique for them. In some instances, the safest and most palatable formulations for children are not even available in the United States and must be purchased in Canada or elsewhere. Reliance upon chemoprophylaxis alone has proven to be increasingly futile. With the introduction of new repellent formulations and nontoxic insecticides for use on clothing or bed netting, there are non-pharmacologic adjunctive measures which can now be considered first-line for the prevention of malaria infections.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1290274

Citation

Bia, F J.. "Malaria Prophylaxis: Taking Aim at Constantly Moving Targets." The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, vol. 65, no. 4, 1992, pp. 329-36.
Bia FJ. Malaria prophylaxis: taking aim at constantly moving targets. Yale J Biol Med. 1992;65(4):329-36.
Bia, F. J. (1992). Malaria prophylaxis: taking aim at constantly moving targets. The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, 65(4), 329-36.
Bia FJ. Malaria Prophylaxis: Taking Aim at Constantly Moving Targets. Yale J Biol Med. 1992 Jul-Aug;65(4):329-36. PubMed PMID: 1290274.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Malaria prophylaxis: taking aim at constantly moving targets. A1 - Bia,F J, PY - 1992/7/1/pubmed PY - 1992/7/1/medline PY - 1992/7/1/entrez SP - 329 EP - 36 JF - The Yale journal of biology and medicine JO - Yale J Biol Med VL - 65 IS - 4 N2 - The prevention of malaria infections is one of the most important functions that any clinician can perform for those traveling to tropical geographic regions where malaria risks are present. The prophylaxis question has become complicated by continued emergence of chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum, the recent appearance of Plasmodium vivax resistance, and the availability of a wide choice of antimalarial pharmaceuticals. Chemoprophylaxis may produce different toxicities among various patient populations. With increasing numbers of women who travel during their professional lives, there are potential implications for using chemoprophylaxis during pregnancy. Children are unable to tolerate certain antimalarials because of toxicities unique for them. In some instances, the safest and most palatable formulations for children are not even available in the United States and must be purchased in Canada or elsewhere. Reliance upon chemoprophylaxis alone has proven to be increasingly futile. With the introduction of new repellent formulations and nontoxic insecticides for use on clothing or bed netting, there are non-pharmacologic adjunctive measures which can now be considered first-line for the prevention of malaria infections. SN - 0044-0086 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1290274/Malaria_prophylaxis:_taking_aim_at_constantly_moving_targets_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/1290274/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -