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The relationship between iris color, hair color, and skin sun sensitivity and the 10-year incidence of age-related maculopathy: the Beaver Dam Eye Study.
Ophthalmology. 2003 Aug; 110(8):1526-33.O

Abstract

PURPOSE

To examine the association between iris color, hair color, and skin sun sensitivity and the 10-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM).

DESIGN

Population-based cohort study.

PARTICIPANTS

A population of 4926 adults (range, 43-86 years of age at baseline) living in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, was studied at baseline (1988-1990); of these, 3684 and 2764 subjects, respectively, participated in 5-year and 10-year follow-up examinations.

METHODS

Data on hair color at age 15 years and skin responsiveness to sun exposure were obtained from a standardized questionnaire administered at the baseline examination. Iris color was determined with penlight illumination during the baseline examination by using photographic standards. Age-related maculopathy status was determined by grading stereoscopic color fundus photos with the Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Incidence and progression of ARM.

RESULTS

When controlling for age and gender, people with brown eyes were significantly more likely to develop soft indistinct drusen (risk ratio [RR], 1.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19-1.97; P < 0.01) than were people with blue eyes. However, people with brown eyes were significantly less likely to develop retinal pigment epithelial depigmentation (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.41-0.82; P < 0.01) than were people with blue eyes. When compared with persons with blond hair, persons with brown hair were at decreased risk of developing pigmentary abnormalities (RR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-1.00; P = 0.05). Iris color, hair color, and skin sun sensitivity were not associated with the development of late ARM.

CONCLUSION

Iris color and hair color were found to be associated with the 10-year incidence of pigmentary abnormalities. Iris color seems to be inconsistently related to the 10-year incidence of early ARM lesions and the progression of ARM.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, Wisconsin 53726-2397, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12917167

Citation

Tomany, Sandra C., et al. "The Relationship Between Iris Color, Hair Color, and Skin Sun Sensitivity and the 10-year Incidence of Age-related Maculopathy: the Beaver Dam Eye Study." Ophthalmology, vol. 110, no. 8, 2003, pp. 1526-33.
Tomany SC, Klein R, Klein BE, et al. The relationship between iris color, hair color, and skin sun sensitivity and the 10-year incidence of age-related maculopathy: the Beaver Dam Eye Study. Ophthalmology. 2003;110(8):1526-33.
Tomany, S. C., Klein, R., & Klein, B. E. (2003). The relationship between iris color, hair color, and skin sun sensitivity and the 10-year incidence of age-related maculopathy: the Beaver Dam Eye Study. Ophthalmology, 110(8), 1526-33.
Tomany SC, et al. The Relationship Between Iris Color, Hair Color, and Skin Sun Sensitivity and the 10-year Incidence of Age-related Maculopathy: the Beaver Dam Eye Study. Ophthalmology. 2003;110(8):1526-33. PubMed PMID: 12917167.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship between iris color, hair color, and skin sun sensitivity and the 10-year incidence of age-related maculopathy: the Beaver Dam Eye Study. AU - Tomany,Sandra C, AU - Klein,Ronald, AU - Klein,Barbara E K, AU - ,, PY - 2003/8/15/pubmed PY - 2003/9/3/medline PY - 2003/8/15/entrez SP - 1526 EP - 33 JF - Ophthalmology JO - Ophthalmology VL - 110 IS - 8 N2 - PURPOSE: To examine the association between iris color, hair color, and skin sun sensitivity and the 10-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM). DESIGN: Population-based cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: A population of 4926 adults (range, 43-86 years of age at baseline) living in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, was studied at baseline (1988-1990); of these, 3684 and 2764 subjects, respectively, participated in 5-year and 10-year follow-up examinations. METHODS: Data on hair color at age 15 years and skin responsiveness to sun exposure were obtained from a standardized questionnaire administered at the baseline examination. Iris color was determined with penlight illumination during the baseline examination by using photographic standards. Age-related maculopathy status was determined by grading stereoscopic color fundus photos with the Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence and progression of ARM. RESULTS: When controlling for age and gender, people with brown eyes were significantly more likely to develop soft indistinct drusen (risk ratio [RR], 1.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19-1.97; P < 0.01) than were people with blue eyes. However, people with brown eyes were significantly less likely to develop retinal pigment epithelial depigmentation (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.41-0.82; P < 0.01) than were people with blue eyes. When compared with persons with blond hair, persons with brown hair were at decreased risk of developing pigmentary abnormalities (RR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53-1.00; P = 0.05). Iris color, hair color, and skin sun sensitivity were not associated with the development of late ARM. CONCLUSION: Iris color and hair color were found to be associated with the 10-year incidence of pigmentary abnormalities. Iris color seems to be inconsistently related to the 10-year incidence of early ARM lesions and the progression of ARM. SN - 0161-6420 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12917167/The_relationship_between_iris_color_hair_color_and_skin_sun_sensitivity_and_the_10_year_incidence_of_age_related_maculopathy:_the_Beaver_Dam_Eye_Study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0161-6420(03)00539-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -