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Premenopausal intakes of vitamins A, C, and E, folate, and carotenoids, and risk of breast cancer.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003 Aug; 12(8):713-20.CE

Abstract

Intakes of vitamins A, C, and E, folate, and carotenoids have been hypothesized to reduce the risk of breast cancer. However, previous epidemiological studies on these nutrients and breast cancer risk have been inconclusive, and have included primarily postmenopausal women. We examined the intake of these nutrients in relation to breast cancer risk among 90,655 premenopausal women ages 26-46 years in 1991 in the Nurses' Health Study II. Nutrient intake was assessed with a validated food-frequency questionnaire at baseline in 1991 and in 1995. During 8 years of follow-up from 1991 to 1999, we documented 714 incident cases of invasive breast cancer. Overall, none of the vitamins and carotenoids was strongly related to a reduced risk of breast cancer. However, intake of vitamin A, including preformed vitamin A and carotenoids, was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer among smokers; participants in the highest quintile of total vitamin A intake had a multivariate relative risk of 0.28 (95% confidence interval 0.12-0.62; P, test for trend <0.001; P, test for interaction <0.001) compared with those in the lowest quintile of intake. We found no evidence that higher intakes of vitamins C and E, and folate in early adult life reduce risk of breast cancer. However, intake of vitamin A may be related to a reduced risk of breast cancer among smokers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. eunyoung.cho@channing.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12917201

Citation

Cho, Eunyoung, et al. "Premenopausal Intakes of Vitamins A, C, and E, Folate, and Carotenoids, and Risk of Breast Cancer." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 12, no. 8, 2003, pp. 713-20.
Cho E, Spiegelman D, Hunter DJ, et al. Premenopausal intakes of vitamins A, C, and E, folate, and carotenoids, and risk of breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003;12(8):713-20.
Cho, E., Spiegelman, D., Hunter, D. J., Chen, W. Y., Zhang, S. M., Colditz, G. A., & Willett, W. C. (2003). Premenopausal intakes of vitamins A, C, and E, folate, and carotenoids, and risk of breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 12(8), 713-20.
Cho E, et al. Premenopausal Intakes of Vitamins A, C, and E, Folate, and Carotenoids, and Risk of Breast Cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003;12(8):713-20. PubMed PMID: 12917201.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Premenopausal intakes of vitamins A, C, and E, folate, and carotenoids, and risk of breast cancer. AU - Cho,Eunyoung, AU - Spiegelman,Donna, AU - Hunter,David J, AU - Chen,Wendy Y, AU - Zhang,Shumin M, AU - Colditz,Graham A, AU - Willett,Walter C, PY - 2003/8/15/pubmed PY - 2003/12/11/medline PY - 2003/8/15/entrez SP - 713 EP - 20 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 12 IS - 8 N2 - Intakes of vitamins A, C, and E, folate, and carotenoids have been hypothesized to reduce the risk of breast cancer. However, previous epidemiological studies on these nutrients and breast cancer risk have been inconclusive, and have included primarily postmenopausal women. We examined the intake of these nutrients in relation to breast cancer risk among 90,655 premenopausal women ages 26-46 years in 1991 in the Nurses' Health Study II. Nutrient intake was assessed with a validated food-frequency questionnaire at baseline in 1991 and in 1995. During 8 years of follow-up from 1991 to 1999, we documented 714 incident cases of invasive breast cancer. Overall, none of the vitamins and carotenoids was strongly related to a reduced risk of breast cancer. However, intake of vitamin A, including preformed vitamin A and carotenoids, was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer among smokers; participants in the highest quintile of total vitamin A intake had a multivariate relative risk of 0.28 (95% confidence interval 0.12-0.62; P, test for trend <0.001; P, test for interaction <0.001) compared with those in the lowest quintile of intake. We found no evidence that higher intakes of vitamins C and E, and folate in early adult life reduce risk of breast cancer. However, intake of vitamin A may be related to a reduced risk of breast cancer among smokers. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12917201/Premenopausal_intakes_of_vitamins_A_C_and_E_folate_and_carotenoids_and_risk_of_breast_cancer_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=12917201 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -