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Lack of evidence for fecal-oral transmission of Helicobacter pylori infection in Taiwanese.
J Formos Med Assoc. 2003 Jun; 102(6):375-8.JF

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Helicobacter pylori infection is primarily acquired in early childhood and its transmission routes are debated. The aims of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) in Taiwanese and to investigate whether a common mode of transmission could be shared between H. pylori and hepatitis A virus (HAV).

METHODS

An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori among 924 healthy volunteers aged less than 40 years, and radioimmunoassay for HAV infection was conducted in 500 subjects from the same population. The kappa statistic was used to measure the difference in positivity for the 2 infections in a subgroup of 500 subjects who had their sera simultaneously tested for anti-H. pylori and anti-HAV antibodies.

RESULTS

The seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori IgG was 16.7% in subjects aged < 16 years and 38.3% at ages >or= 16 years. Most children (99%) under the age of 16 were seronegative for HAV. The prevalence of H. pylori infection increased rapidly with age, at 1%/year and 0.8%/year for children and adults, respectively. The rate of H. pylori infection was higher in male (21%) than in female (12%) children (p < 0.01; OR, 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 3.0). No significant difference in seroprevalence between genders was noted in subjects aged >or= 16 years. The agreement in the trend of seropositivity between both infections in the age groups 1 to 10 years and 10 to 20 years was worse than chance (kappa = -0.56) and little better than chance (kappa = 0.01), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Acquisition of H. pylori infection occurs at a young age, and male children are more likely to develop the infection. The main transmission route of HAV, the fecal-oral route, did not seem to be responsible for H. pylori transmission in this Taiwanese cohort.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, and Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Cheng Kung University and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12923589

Citation

Yang, Yao-Jong, et al. "Lack of Evidence for Fecal-oral Transmission of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Taiwanese." Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan Yi Zhi, vol. 102, no. 6, 2003, pp. 375-8.
Yang YJ, Wang SM, Chen CT, et al. Lack of evidence for fecal-oral transmission of Helicobacter pylori infection in Taiwanese. J Formos Med Assoc. 2003;102(6):375-8.
Yang, Y. J., Wang, S. M., Chen, C. T., Huang, M. C., Chang, C. J., & Liu, C. C. (2003). Lack of evidence for fecal-oral transmission of Helicobacter pylori infection in Taiwanese. Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan Yi Zhi, 102(6), 375-8.
Yang YJ, et al. Lack of Evidence for Fecal-oral Transmission of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Taiwanese. J Formos Med Assoc. 2003;102(6):375-8. PubMed PMID: 12923589.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lack of evidence for fecal-oral transmission of Helicobacter pylori infection in Taiwanese. AU - Yang,Yao-Jong, AU - Wang,Shih-Min, AU - Chen,Chun-Ta, AU - Huang,Mei-Chih, AU - Chang,Chih-Jen, AU - Liu,Ching-Chuan, PY - 2003/8/19/pubmed PY - 2003/10/29/medline PY - 2003/8/19/entrez SP - 375 EP - 8 JF - Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan yi zhi JO - J Formos Med Assoc VL - 102 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Helicobacter pylori infection is primarily acquired in early childhood and its transmission routes are debated. The aims of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) in Taiwanese and to investigate whether a common mode of transmission could be shared between H. pylori and hepatitis A virus (HAV). METHODS: An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori among 924 healthy volunteers aged less than 40 years, and radioimmunoassay for HAV infection was conducted in 500 subjects from the same population. The kappa statistic was used to measure the difference in positivity for the 2 infections in a subgroup of 500 subjects who had their sera simultaneously tested for anti-H. pylori and anti-HAV antibodies. RESULTS: The seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori IgG was 16.7% in subjects aged < 16 years and 38.3% at ages >or= 16 years. Most children (99%) under the age of 16 were seronegative for HAV. The prevalence of H. pylori infection increased rapidly with age, at 1%/year and 0.8%/year for children and adults, respectively. The rate of H. pylori infection was higher in male (21%) than in female (12%) children (p < 0.01; OR, 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 3.0). No significant difference in seroprevalence between genders was noted in subjects aged >or= 16 years. The agreement in the trend of seropositivity between both infections in the age groups 1 to 10 years and 10 to 20 years was worse than chance (kappa = -0.56) and little better than chance (kappa = 0.01), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Acquisition of H. pylori infection occurs at a young age, and male children are more likely to develop the infection. The main transmission route of HAV, the fecal-oral route, did not seem to be responsible for H. pylori transmission in this Taiwanese cohort. SN - 0929-6646 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12923589/Lack_of_evidence_for_fecal_oral_transmission_of_Helicobacter_pylori_infection_in_Taiwanese_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -