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Height, body mass index, and ovarian cancer: a follow-up of 1.1 million Norwegian women.
J Natl Cancer Inst 2003; 95(16):1244-8JNCI

Abstract

Body mass index (BMI) has shown both positive and negative associations with ovarian cancer. Whether a possible association between height and ovarian cancer exists is unknown. We explored whether BMI and height were associated with ovarian cancer risk in a Norwegian cohort of approximately 1.1 million women, aged 14-74 years who were measured between 1963 and 1999. The cohort was followed for an average of 25 years through linkage to population-based cancer and death registries. Among the cohort, 7882 histologically verified cases of ovarian cancer were registered. Relative to women with a medium BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), women who were overweight or obese in adolescence or young adulthood had an increased risk of ovarian cancer; women with a very high BMI in adolescence had a relative risk of 1.56 (95% confidence interval = 1.04 to 2.32) compared with women with medium BMI. No such association was seen in older women. A positive association between height and risk of ovarian cancer, particularly endometrioid ovarian cancer, was observed in women younger than 60 years of age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. anders.engeland@fhi.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12928351

Citation

Engeland, Anders, et al. "Height, Body Mass Index, and Ovarian Cancer: a Follow-up of 1.1 Million Norwegian Women." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 95, no. 16, 2003, pp. 1244-8.
Engeland A, Tretli S, Bjørge T. Height, body mass index, and ovarian cancer: a follow-up of 1.1 million Norwegian women. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2003;95(16):1244-8.
Engeland, A., Tretli, S., & Bjørge, T. (2003). Height, body mass index, and ovarian cancer: a follow-up of 1.1 million Norwegian women. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 95(16), pp. 1244-8.
Engeland A, Tretli S, Bjørge T. Height, Body Mass Index, and Ovarian Cancer: a Follow-up of 1.1 Million Norwegian Women. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2003 Aug 20;95(16):1244-8. PubMed PMID: 12928351.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Height, body mass index, and ovarian cancer: a follow-up of 1.1 million Norwegian women. AU - Engeland,Anders, AU - Tretli,Steinar, AU - Bjørge,Tone, PY - 2003/8/21/pubmed PY - 2003/9/3/medline PY - 2003/8/21/entrez SP - 1244 EP - 8 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 95 IS - 16 N2 - Body mass index (BMI) has shown both positive and negative associations with ovarian cancer. Whether a possible association between height and ovarian cancer exists is unknown. We explored whether BMI and height were associated with ovarian cancer risk in a Norwegian cohort of approximately 1.1 million women, aged 14-74 years who were measured between 1963 and 1999. The cohort was followed for an average of 25 years through linkage to population-based cancer and death registries. Among the cohort, 7882 histologically verified cases of ovarian cancer were registered. Relative to women with a medium BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), women who were overweight or obese in adolescence or young adulthood had an increased risk of ovarian cancer; women with a very high BMI in adolescence had a relative risk of 1.56 (95% confidence interval = 1.04 to 2.32) compared with women with medium BMI. No such association was seen in older women. A positive association between height and risk of ovarian cancer, particularly endometrioid ovarian cancer, was observed in women younger than 60 years of age. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12928351/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djg010 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -