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Height, body mass index, and ovarian cancer: a follow-up of 1.1 million Norwegian women.

Abstract

Body mass index (BMI) has shown both positive and negative associations with ovarian cancer. Whether a possible association between height and ovarian cancer exists is unknown. We explored whether BMI and height were associated with ovarian cancer risk in a Norwegian cohort of approximately 1.1 million women, aged 14-74 years who were measured between 1963 and 1999. The cohort was followed for an average of 25 years through linkage to population-based cancer and death registries. Among the cohort, 7882 histologically verified cases of ovarian cancer were registered. Relative to women with a medium BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), women who were overweight or obese in adolescence or young adulthood had an increased risk of ovarian cancer; women with a very high BMI in adolescence had a relative risk of 1.56 (95% confidence interval = 1.04 to 2.32) compared with women with medium BMI. No such association was seen in older women. A positive association between height and risk of ovarian cancer, particularly endometrioid ovarian cancer, was observed in women younger than 60 years of age.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. anders.engeland@fhi.no

    ,

    Source

    Journal of the National Cancer Institute 95:16 2003 Aug 20 pg 1244-8

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Aged
    Body Height
    Body Mass Index
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Norway
    Obesity
    Ovarian Neoplasms
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12928351

    Citation

    Engeland, Anders, et al. "Height, Body Mass Index, and Ovarian Cancer: a Follow-up of 1.1 Million Norwegian Women." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 95, no. 16, 2003, pp. 1244-8.
    Engeland A, Tretli S, Bjørge T. Height, body mass index, and ovarian cancer: a follow-up of 1.1 million Norwegian women. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2003;95(16):1244-8.
    Engeland, A., Tretli, S., & Bjørge, T. (2003). Height, body mass index, and ovarian cancer: a follow-up of 1.1 million Norwegian women. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 95(16), pp. 1244-8.
    Engeland A, Tretli S, Bjørge T. Height, Body Mass Index, and Ovarian Cancer: a Follow-up of 1.1 Million Norwegian Women. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2003 Aug 20;95(16):1244-8. PubMed PMID: 12928351.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Height, body mass index, and ovarian cancer: a follow-up of 1.1 million Norwegian women. AU - Engeland,Anders, AU - Tretli,Steinar, AU - Bjørge,Tone, PY - 2003/8/21/pubmed PY - 2003/9/3/medline PY - 2003/8/21/entrez SP - 1244 EP - 8 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 95 IS - 16 N2 - Body mass index (BMI) has shown both positive and negative associations with ovarian cancer. Whether a possible association between height and ovarian cancer exists is unknown. We explored whether BMI and height were associated with ovarian cancer risk in a Norwegian cohort of approximately 1.1 million women, aged 14-74 years who were measured between 1963 and 1999. The cohort was followed for an average of 25 years through linkage to population-based cancer and death registries. Among the cohort, 7882 histologically verified cases of ovarian cancer were registered. Relative to women with a medium BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), women who were overweight or obese in adolescence or young adulthood had an increased risk of ovarian cancer; women with a very high BMI in adolescence had a relative risk of 1.56 (95% confidence interval = 1.04 to 2.32) compared with women with medium BMI. No such association was seen in older women. A positive association between height and risk of ovarian cancer, particularly endometrioid ovarian cancer, was observed in women younger than 60 years of age. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12928351/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djg010 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -