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Hiatal hernia, reflux symptoms, body size, and risk of esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma.
Cancer. 2003 Sep 01; 98(5):940-8.C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Since the 1970s, incidence rates of esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma have risen substantially. Reasons for the increasing trends are not well understood.

METHODS

A population-based, case-control study that included esophageal adenocarcinomas (n = 222), gastric cardia adenocarcinomas (n = 277), distal gastric adenocarcinomas (n = 443), and 1356 controls was conducted in Los Angeles County. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the 3 tumor types.

RESULTS

After adjustment for demographic factors, smoking, and body size, both hiatal hernia and reflux symptoms emerged as significant independent risk factors. Risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma was increased 3-fold (adjusted OR, 3.61; 95% CI, 2.49-5.25) among those who had reflux symptoms but did not have hiatal hernia, 6-fold (adjusted OR, 5.85; 95% CI, 3.18-10.75) among those who had hiatal hernia but did not have reflux symptoms, and 8-fold (adjusted OR, 8.11; 95% CI, 4.75-13.87) among those who had both reflux symptoms and hiatal hernia. A similar risk pattern was found in relation to history of hiatal hernia and other reflux conditions. A more modest but still significant risk pattern was observed for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Among control subjects, there was a significant and positive association between increasing body mass index and history of hiatal hernia and/or reflux symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS

Hiatal hernia, in combination with other reflux conditions and symptoms, was associated strongly with the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. These associations were more modest for gastric cardia adenocarcinomas. A significant and positive association between body size and history of hiatal hernia/reflux symptoms also was observed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, MC 9175, Los Angeles, CA 90089-9175, USA. annawu@hsc.usc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12942560

Citation

Wu, Anna H., et al. "Hiatal Hernia, Reflux Symptoms, Body Size, and Risk of Esophageal and Gastric Adenocarcinoma." Cancer, vol. 98, no. 5, 2003, pp. 940-8.
Wu AH, Tseng CC, Bernstein L. Hiatal hernia, reflux symptoms, body size, and risk of esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma. Cancer. 2003;98(5):940-8.
Wu, A. H., Tseng, C. C., & Bernstein, L. (2003). Hiatal hernia, reflux symptoms, body size, and risk of esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma. Cancer, 98(5), 940-8.
Wu AH, Tseng CC, Bernstein L. Hiatal Hernia, Reflux Symptoms, Body Size, and Risk of Esophageal and Gastric Adenocarcinoma. Cancer. 2003 Sep 1;98(5):940-8. PubMed PMID: 12942560.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hiatal hernia, reflux symptoms, body size, and risk of esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma. AU - Wu,Anna H, AU - Tseng,Chiu-Chen, AU - Bernstein,Leslie, PY - 2003/8/28/pubmed PY - 2003/9/17/medline PY - 2003/8/28/entrez SP - 940 EP - 8 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 98 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Since the 1970s, incidence rates of esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma have risen substantially. Reasons for the increasing trends are not well understood. METHODS: A population-based, case-control study that included esophageal adenocarcinomas (n = 222), gastric cardia adenocarcinomas (n = 277), distal gastric adenocarcinomas (n = 443), and 1356 controls was conducted in Los Angeles County. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the 3 tumor types. RESULTS: After adjustment for demographic factors, smoking, and body size, both hiatal hernia and reflux symptoms emerged as significant independent risk factors. Risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma was increased 3-fold (adjusted OR, 3.61; 95% CI, 2.49-5.25) among those who had reflux symptoms but did not have hiatal hernia, 6-fold (adjusted OR, 5.85; 95% CI, 3.18-10.75) among those who had hiatal hernia but did not have reflux symptoms, and 8-fold (adjusted OR, 8.11; 95% CI, 4.75-13.87) among those who had both reflux symptoms and hiatal hernia. A similar risk pattern was found in relation to history of hiatal hernia and other reflux conditions. A more modest but still significant risk pattern was observed for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Among control subjects, there was a significant and positive association between increasing body mass index and history of hiatal hernia and/or reflux symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Hiatal hernia, in combination with other reflux conditions and symptoms, was associated strongly with the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. These associations were more modest for gastric cardia adenocarcinomas. A significant and positive association between body size and history of hiatal hernia/reflux symptoms also was observed. SN - 0008-543X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12942560/Hiatal_hernia_reflux_symptoms_body_size_and_risk_of_esophageal_and_gastric_adenocarcinoma_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.11568 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -