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Thermally oxidized dietary fats increase the susceptibility of rat LDL to lipid peroxidation but not their uptake by macrophages.
J Nutr. 2003 Sep; 133(9):2830-7.JN

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary oxidized fats on the lipoprotein profile and the atherogenicity of LDL. Two experiments with male Sprague-Dawley rats were conducted. In Experiment 1, diets with either fresh fat or oxidized fat, prepared by heating at temperatures of 50, 105 or 190 degrees C, containing either 25 or 250 mg alpha-tocopherol equivalents/kg were used. In Experiment 2, diets with fresh or oxidized fat, heated at a temperature of 55 degrees C, containing 25 mg alpha-tocopherol equivalents/kg, were used. In Experiment 1, rats fed all types of oxidized fats had higher concentrations of HDL cholesterol and lower ratios between plasma and HDL cholesterol than rats fed the diet containing the fresh fat. As determined from the lag time, the susceptibility of LDL to copper-induced lipid peroxidation was higher in rats fed oxidized fats heated at 105 or 190 degrees C than in rats fed the diets containing the fresh fat or the oxidized fat treated at 50 degrees C, irrespective of the dietary vitamin E concentration. However, in Experiment 2, the composition of LDL apolipoproteins and uptake of LDL by macrophages were not different between rats fed the fresh fat diet and those fed the oxidized fat diet. We conclude that ingestion of oxidized fats does not adversely affect the lipoprotein profile in the rat model used, and does not cause modifications of apolipoproteins that would lead to enhanced uptake of LDL via macrophage scavenger receptors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Martin-Luther-University of Halle-Wittenberg, Emil-Abderhalden-Strassse 26, D-06108 Halle/Saale, Germany. eder@landw.uni.halle.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12949373

Citation

Eder, Klaus, et al. "Thermally Oxidized Dietary Fats Increase the Susceptibility of Rat LDL to Lipid Peroxidation but Not Their Uptake By Macrophages." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 133, no. 9, 2003, pp. 2830-7.
Eder K, Keller U, Hirche F, et al. Thermally oxidized dietary fats increase the susceptibility of rat LDL to lipid peroxidation but not their uptake by macrophages. J Nutr. 2003;133(9):2830-7.
Eder, K., Keller, U., Hirche, F., & Brandsch, C. (2003). Thermally oxidized dietary fats increase the susceptibility of rat LDL to lipid peroxidation but not their uptake by macrophages. The Journal of Nutrition, 133(9), 2830-7.
Eder K, et al. Thermally Oxidized Dietary Fats Increase the Susceptibility of Rat LDL to Lipid Peroxidation but Not Their Uptake By Macrophages. J Nutr. 2003;133(9):2830-7. PubMed PMID: 12949373.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Thermally oxidized dietary fats increase the susceptibility of rat LDL to lipid peroxidation but not their uptake by macrophages. AU - Eder,Klaus, AU - Keller,Uta, AU - Hirche,Frank, AU - Brandsch,Corinna, PY - 2003/9/2/pubmed PY - 2003/10/29/medline PY - 2003/9/2/entrez SP - 2830 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 133 IS - 9 N2 - The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary oxidized fats on the lipoprotein profile and the atherogenicity of LDL. Two experiments with male Sprague-Dawley rats were conducted. In Experiment 1, diets with either fresh fat or oxidized fat, prepared by heating at temperatures of 50, 105 or 190 degrees C, containing either 25 or 250 mg alpha-tocopherol equivalents/kg were used. In Experiment 2, diets with fresh or oxidized fat, heated at a temperature of 55 degrees C, containing 25 mg alpha-tocopherol equivalents/kg, were used. In Experiment 1, rats fed all types of oxidized fats had higher concentrations of HDL cholesterol and lower ratios between plasma and HDL cholesterol than rats fed the diet containing the fresh fat. As determined from the lag time, the susceptibility of LDL to copper-induced lipid peroxidation was higher in rats fed oxidized fats heated at 105 or 190 degrees C than in rats fed the diets containing the fresh fat or the oxidized fat treated at 50 degrees C, irrespective of the dietary vitamin E concentration. However, in Experiment 2, the composition of LDL apolipoproteins and uptake of LDL by macrophages were not different between rats fed the fresh fat diet and those fed the oxidized fat diet. We conclude that ingestion of oxidized fats does not adversely affect the lipoprotein profile in the rat model used, and does not cause modifications of apolipoproteins that would lead to enhanced uptake of LDL via macrophage scavenger receptors. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12949373/Thermally_oxidized_dietary_fats_increase_the_susceptibility_of_rat_LDL_to_lipid_peroxidation_but_not_their_uptake_by_macrophages_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/133.9.2830 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -