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Vitamin intake in Japanese women college students.
J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo) 2003; 49(3):149-55JN

Abstract

The Standard Food Tables of Japanese Foods was newly revised in 2000, and contains information on all of the vitamins except biotin. Thus, we carried out a survey of vitamin intake in Japanese women who were university seniors majoring a dietitian course. The subjects (n = 33) consumed self-selected foods, and food intake was recorded by the weight method. We calculated the vitamin intake except for biotin from the food records using the Standard Food Tables of Japanese Foods. In terms of daily intake, vitamin A was 705+/-435 microg (mean+/-SD), vitamin D 6+/-8 microg, vitamin E 7.7+/-3.0 mg, vitamin K 191+/-156 microg, vitamin B1 0.7+/-0.3 mg (0.43+/-0.15 mg/1,000 kcal), vitamin B2 1.1+/-0.4 mg (0.65+/-0.18 mg/1,000 kcal), vitamin B6 0.9+/-0.4 mg (0.017+/-0.005 mg/g protein), vitamin B12 4.4+/-4.1 microg, niacin equivalent 23+/-7 mg (14.4+/-4.9 mg/1,000 kcal), pantothenic acid 4.6+/-1.4 mg, folic acid 267+/-115 microg, and vitamin C 73+/-38 mg. All of these averages were around the Japanese Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for level "III (preferable)" of physical activity. Major vitamin A resources were vegetables; vitamin D resources, fish; vitamin E resources, fats and oils and vegetables; vitamin K resources, vegetables; vitamin B1 resources, cereals and animal meats; vitamin B2 resources, various foods; vitamin B6 resources, cereals, vegetables, fish, and animal meats; vitamin B12 resources, fish; niacin equivalent resources, fish, animal meats, and cereals; pantothenic acid resources, various foods; folic acid resources, vegetables; and vitamin C resources, vegetables and potatoes. From this survey, it was found that Japanese women college students consumed many kinds of food, and therefore, their vitamin nutrition was good as compared to the RDA values for level III of physical activity; however, their energy intake (1,622+/-377 kcal) was lower than the RDA for level III (2,050 kcal/d). Their strength of physical activity would be level I. Therefore, in consideration of their lifestyle, their energy intakes is considered adequate. In conclusion, a problem for student lifestyle is a shortage of food intake due to lack of exercise.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Food Science, Department of Life Style Studies, School of Human Cultures, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassakacho, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12953791

Citation

Kimura, Naoko, et al. "Vitamin Intake in Japanese Women College Students." Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology, vol. 49, no. 3, 2003, pp. 149-55.
Kimura N, Fukuwatari T, Sasaki R, et al. Vitamin intake in Japanese women college students. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol. 2003;49(3):149-55.
Kimura, N., Fukuwatari, T., Sasaki, R., Hayakawa, F., & Shibata, K. (2003). Vitamin intake in Japanese women college students. Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology, 49(3), pp. 149-55.
Kimura N, et al. Vitamin Intake in Japanese Women College Students. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol. 2003;49(3):149-55. PubMed PMID: 12953791.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin intake in Japanese women college students. AU - Kimura,Naoko, AU - Fukuwatari,Tsutomu, AU - Sasaki,Ryuzo, AU - Hayakawa,Fumiko, AU - Shibata,Katsumi, PY - 2003/9/5/pubmed PY - 2004/2/6/medline PY - 2003/9/5/entrez SP - 149 EP - 55 JF - Journal of nutritional science and vitaminology JO - J. Nutr. Sci. Vitaminol. VL - 49 IS - 3 N2 - The Standard Food Tables of Japanese Foods was newly revised in 2000, and contains information on all of the vitamins except biotin. Thus, we carried out a survey of vitamin intake in Japanese women who were university seniors majoring a dietitian course. The subjects (n = 33) consumed self-selected foods, and food intake was recorded by the weight method. We calculated the vitamin intake except for biotin from the food records using the Standard Food Tables of Japanese Foods. In terms of daily intake, vitamin A was 705+/-435 microg (mean+/-SD), vitamin D 6+/-8 microg, vitamin E 7.7+/-3.0 mg, vitamin K 191+/-156 microg, vitamin B1 0.7+/-0.3 mg (0.43+/-0.15 mg/1,000 kcal), vitamin B2 1.1+/-0.4 mg (0.65+/-0.18 mg/1,000 kcal), vitamin B6 0.9+/-0.4 mg (0.017+/-0.005 mg/g protein), vitamin B12 4.4+/-4.1 microg, niacin equivalent 23+/-7 mg (14.4+/-4.9 mg/1,000 kcal), pantothenic acid 4.6+/-1.4 mg, folic acid 267+/-115 microg, and vitamin C 73+/-38 mg. All of these averages were around the Japanese Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for level "III (preferable)" of physical activity. Major vitamin A resources were vegetables; vitamin D resources, fish; vitamin E resources, fats and oils and vegetables; vitamin K resources, vegetables; vitamin B1 resources, cereals and animal meats; vitamin B2 resources, various foods; vitamin B6 resources, cereals, vegetables, fish, and animal meats; vitamin B12 resources, fish; niacin equivalent resources, fish, animal meats, and cereals; pantothenic acid resources, various foods; folic acid resources, vegetables; and vitamin C resources, vegetables and potatoes. From this survey, it was found that Japanese women college students consumed many kinds of food, and therefore, their vitamin nutrition was good as compared to the RDA values for level III of physical activity; however, their energy intake (1,622+/-377 kcal) was lower than the RDA for level III (2,050 kcal/d). Their strength of physical activity would be level I. Therefore, in consideration of their lifestyle, their energy intakes is considered adequate. In conclusion, a problem for student lifestyle is a shortage of food intake due to lack of exercise. SN - 0301-4800 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12953791/Vitamin_intake_in_Japanese_women_college_students_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/exerciseandphysicalfitness.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -