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Minimal effect of a low-fat/high soy diet for asymptomatic, hormonally naive prostate cancer patients.
Clin Cancer Res. 2003 Aug 15; 9(9):3282-7.CC

Abstract

PURPOSE

The effects of a low-fat diet or a low-fat diet with the addition of a soy supplement were investigated in a pilot Phase II study for asymptomatic, hormonally naive prostate cancer patients with rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN

A two-step intervention was implemented. During step 1 patients were begun on a low-fat diet with a goal to reduce fat intake to 15% of total daily calories. On PSA progression, a soy protein supplement was added to the diet (step 2). The primary end point was PSA reduction by 50%. Secondary end points were PSA doubling time and time to progression (TTP). Serum was analyzed for changes in the sex hormone and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) axes.

RESULTS

Among 18 evaluable patients, (median follow-up on study 10.5 months), no patient on either step had a PSA reduction by 50% at any time. There was a trend toward a longer PSA doubling time (P = 0.06) and a prolongation in estimated median TTP of approximately 3 months (P = 0.018) during step 2 compared with step 1 of the study. During step 1, free testosterone levels decreased by 5% (P < 0.01), and during step 2, IGF-I levels increased by 22% (P = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

A low-fat diet with the subsequent addition of a soy supplement did not result in a significant decline in PSA levels. The addition of soy protein had a modest effect on TTP. A potentially undesirable effect associated with the administration of soy was an increase in IGF-I serum levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Divisions of Hematology/Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Clinical Trial, Phase II
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12960113

Citation

Spentzos, Dimitrios, et al. "Minimal Effect of a Low-fat/high Soy Diet for Asymptomatic, Hormonally Naive Prostate Cancer Patients." Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, vol. 9, no. 9, 2003, pp. 3282-7.
Spentzos D, Mantzoros C, Regan MM, et al. Minimal effect of a low-fat/high soy diet for asymptomatic, hormonally naive prostate cancer patients. Clin Cancer Res. 2003;9(9):3282-7.
Spentzos, D., Mantzoros, C., Regan, M. M., Morrissey, M. E., Duggan, S., Flickner-Garvey, S., McCormick, H., DeWolf, W., Balk, S., & Bubley, G. J. (2003). Minimal effect of a low-fat/high soy diet for asymptomatic, hormonally naive prostate cancer patients. Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, 9(9), 3282-7.
Spentzos D, et al. Minimal Effect of a Low-fat/high Soy Diet for Asymptomatic, Hormonally Naive Prostate Cancer Patients. Clin Cancer Res. 2003 Aug 15;9(9):3282-7. PubMed PMID: 12960113.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Minimal effect of a low-fat/high soy diet for asymptomatic, hormonally naive prostate cancer patients. AU - Spentzos,Dimitrios, AU - Mantzoros,Christos, AU - Regan,Meredith M, AU - Morrissey,Mary Ellen, AU - Duggan,Stephen, AU - Flickner-Garvey,Stacy, AU - McCormick,Heather, AU - DeWolf,William, AU - Balk,Steve, AU - Bubley,Glenn J, PY - 2003/9/10/pubmed PY - 2004/5/15/medline PY - 2003/9/10/entrez SP - 3282 EP - 7 JF - Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research JO - Clin. Cancer Res. VL - 9 IS - 9 N2 - PURPOSE: The effects of a low-fat diet or a low-fat diet with the addition of a soy supplement were investigated in a pilot Phase II study for asymptomatic, hormonally naive prostate cancer patients with rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A two-step intervention was implemented. During step 1 patients were begun on a low-fat diet with a goal to reduce fat intake to 15% of total daily calories. On PSA progression, a soy protein supplement was added to the diet (step 2). The primary end point was PSA reduction by 50%. Secondary end points were PSA doubling time and time to progression (TTP). Serum was analyzed for changes in the sex hormone and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) axes. RESULTS: Among 18 evaluable patients, (median follow-up on study 10.5 months), no patient on either step had a PSA reduction by 50% at any time. There was a trend toward a longer PSA doubling time (P = 0.06) and a prolongation in estimated median TTP of approximately 3 months (P = 0.018) during step 2 compared with step 1 of the study. During step 1, free testosterone levels decreased by 5% (P < 0.01), and during step 2, IGF-I levels increased by 22% (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: A low-fat diet with the subsequent addition of a soy supplement did not result in a significant decline in PSA levels. The addition of soy protein had a modest effect on TTP. A potentially undesirable effect associated with the administration of soy was an increase in IGF-I serum levels. SN - 1078-0432 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12960113/Minimal_effect_of_a_low_fat/high_soy_diet_for_asymptomatic_hormonally_naive_prostate_cancer_patients_ L2 - http://clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=12960113 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -