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Hot flashes in breast cancer survivors.

Abstract

Hot flashes can be a major problem for patients with a history of breast cancer. The precipitation of menopause in premenopausal women who undergo chemotherapy for breast cancer can lead to the rapid onset of hot flash symptoms that are more frequent and more severe than those associated with natural menopause. In addition, tamoxifen, historically the most commonly prescribed pharmacologic agent for the treatment of breast cancer, is associated with hot flashes in more than 50% of its users. Although estrogen relieves hot flashes in 80-90% of women who initiate treatment, its use in women with a history of breast cancer is controversial, and most physicians in the community will not use this treatment modality. In addition, the results of the long-awaited Women's Health Initiative study and other recent studies suggest that long-term estrogen therapy should not be recommended for most women for a variety of reasons. However, hot flashes in breast cancer survivors should no longer be considered untreatable, as there are many pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments that can help alleviate this problem. This article reviews the current strategies for the management of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors and the evidence supporting their use.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.

    ,

    Source

    The breast journal 9:5 pg 431-8

    MeSH

    Antidepressive Agents
    Breast Neoplasms
    Estrogen Replacement Therapy
    Female
    Hot Flashes
    Humans
    Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
    Survivors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12968972

    Citation

    Hoda, Daanish, et al. "Hot Flashes in Breast Cancer Survivors." The Breast Journal, vol. 9, no. 5, 2003, pp. 431-8.
    Hoda D, Perez DG, Loprinzi CL. Hot flashes in breast cancer survivors. Breast J. 2003;9(5):431-8.
    Hoda, D., Perez, D. G., & Loprinzi, C. L. (2003). Hot flashes in breast cancer survivors. The Breast Journal, 9(5), pp. 431-8.
    Hoda D, Perez DG, Loprinzi CL. Hot Flashes in Breast Cancer Survivors. Breast J. 2003;9(5):431-8. PubMed PMID: 12968972.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Hot flashes in breast cancer survivors. AU - Hoda,Daanish, AU - Perez,Domingo G, AU - Loprinzi,Charles L, PY - 2003/9/13/pubmed PY - 2004/1/17/medline PY - 2003/9/13/entrez SP - 431 EP - 8 JF - The breast journal JO - Breast J VL - 9 IS - 5 N2 - Hot flashes can be a major problem for patients with a history of breast cancer. The precipitation of menopause in premenopausal women who undergo chemotherapy for breast cancer can lead to the rapid onset of hot flash symptoms that are more frequent and more severe than those associated with natural menopause. In addition, tamoxifen, historically the most commonly prescribed pharmacologic agent for the treatment of breast cancer, is associated with hot flashes in more than 50% of its users. Although estrogen relieves hot flashes in 80-90% of women who initiate treatment, its use in women with a history of breast cancer is controversial, and most physicians in the community will not use this treatment modality. In addition, the results of the long-awaited Women's Health Initiative study and other recent studies suggest that long-term estrogen therapy should not be recommended for most women for a variety of reasons. However, hot flashes in breast cancer survivors should no longer be considered untreatable, as there are many pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments that can help alleviate this problem. This article reviews the current strategies for the management of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors and the evidence supporting their use. SN - 1075-122X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12968972/Hot_flashes_in_breast_cancer_survivors_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=12968972.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -