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Current status of soil-transmitted helminths in Vietnam.

Abstract

This paper provides a review of surveys on soil-transmitted helminths that were done in Vietnam between 1990 and 2001. Prevalence estimates could be obtained for 29 of the 61 provinces. Extrapolating from this, it is estimated that 33.9 million people in Vietnam are infected with Ascaris (prevalence 44.4%), 17.6 million with Trichuris (prevalence 23.1%), and 21.8 million with hookworm (prevalence 28.6%). Prevalence of Ascaris and Trichuris showed a declining trend from the north to the south of the country. This is probably related to differences in climatic conditions. Hookworm prevalence is more evenly distributed throughout the country, but is concentrated in peri-urban and rural agricultural areas. Vegetable cultivation in which nightsoil is used as fertilizer is a risk factor for hookworm infection, especially among adult women. Helminth control programs should be targeted at school-age children in the northern provinces. Specific interventions are needed throughout the country for women of agricultural communities that are at risk for hookworm infection. There is clearly a need for more detailed analysis of risk factors to quantify the relative contribution of climatic, environmental, and human behavioral factors in the transmission of intestinal nematode infections in Vietnam.

Authors+Show Affiliations

International Water Management Institute, Colombo, Sri Lanka. w.van-der-hoek@cgiar.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12971504

Citation

van der Hoek, Wim, et al. "Current Status of Soil-transmitted Helminths in Vietnam." The Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, vol. 34 Suppl 1, 2003, pp. 1-11.
van der Hoek W, De NV, Konradsen F, et al. Current status of soil-transmitted helminths in Vietnam. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2003;34 Suppl 1:1-11.
van der Hoek, W., De, N. V., Konradsen, F., Cam, P. D., Hoa, N. T., Toan, N. D., & Cong, l. e. . D. (2003). Current status of soil-transmitted helminths in Vietnam. The Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, 34 Suppl 1, 1-11.
van der Hoek W, et al. Current Status of Soil-transmitted Helminths in Vietnam. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2003;34 Suppl 1:1-11. PubMed PMID: 12971504.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Current status of soil-transmitted helminths in Vietnam. AU - van der Hoek,Wim, AU - De,Nguyen Van, AU - Konradsen,Flemming, AU - Cam,Phung Dac, AU - Hoa,Nguyen Thi Viet, AU - Toan,Nguyen Duy, AU - Cong,Le Dinh, PY - 2003/9/16/pubmed PY - 2003/10/11/medline PY - 2003/9/16/entrez SP - 1 EP - 11 JF - The Southeast Asian journal of tropical medicine and public health JO - Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health VL - 34 Suppl 1 N2 - This paper provides a review of surveys on soil-transmitted helminths that were done in Vietnam between 1990 and 2001. Prevalence estimates could be obtained for 29 of the 61 provinces. Extrapolating from this, it is estimated that 33.9 million people in Vietnam are infected with Ascaris (prevalence 44.4%), 17.6 million with Trichuris (prevalence 23.1%), and 21.8 million with hookworm (prevalence 28.6%). Prevalence of Ascaris and Trichuris showed a declining trend from the north to the south of the country. This is probably related to differences in climatic conditions. Hookworm prevalence is more evenly distributed throughout the country, but is concentrated in peri-urban and rural agricultural areas. Vegetable cultivation in which nightsoil is used as fertilizer is a risk factor for hookworm infection, especially among adult women. Helminth control programs should be targeted at school-age children in the northern provinces. Specific interventions are needed throughout the country for women of agricultural communities that are at risk for hookworm infection. There is clearly a need for more detailed analysis of risk factors to quantify the relative contribution of climatic, environmental, and human behavioral factors in the transmission of intestinal nematode infections in Vietnam. SN - 0125-1562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12971504/Current_status_of_soil_transmitted_helminths_in_Vietnam_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -