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Selenoenzyme activities in selenium- and iodine-deficient sheep.
Biol Trace Elem Res 2003; 94(3):213-24BT

Abstract

This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of single and combined deficiencies of selenium and iodine on selenoenzyme activities in sheep. Twenty-four male lambs were assigned to one of four semisynthetic diets: combined deficient A (Se-I), Se-deficient B (Se-I+), I-deficient C (Se+I-), and basal diet D (Se+I+). Thyroid hormones (T3, T4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and inorganic iodine (PII) were determined in plasma. Selenium and glutathione peroxidase activity (GSH-Px) were determined in erythrocytes, and tissue samples, including the thyroid, liver, kidney, and brain, were taken for selenoenzyme analysis. Plasma T3, T4, and TSH concentrations were similar in all groups. Type I deiodinase (ID-I) activity in liver and kidney remained unchanged in Se or I deficiency. In contrast, hepatic ID-I activity was increased by 70% in combined Se-I deficiency. Thyroidal cystolic GSHPx (c-GSH-Px) and phospholipid GSH-Px (ph-GSH-Px) activities remained constant in both Se-deficient groups, whereas thyroidal c-GSH-Px activity increased (57%) in I deficiency. Type II deiodinase (ID-II) activity was not detectable in the cerebrum and cerebellum, whereas cerebellum Type III deiodinase (ID-III) activity was decreased in I deficiency and combined Se-I deficiencies. The results of the present study support a sensitive interaction between Se and I deficiencies in sheep thyroid and brain. Furthermore, the lack of thyroidal ID-I activity, the preservation of the thyroidal antioxidant enzymes, and the increases in hepatic ID-I indicate that a compensatory mechanism(s) works toward retaining plasma T3 levels, mostly by de novo synthesis of T3 and peripheral deiodination of T4 in Se- and I-deficient sheep.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, Votanikos, Athens 11855, Greece.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12972689

Citation

Voudouri, Anna E., et al. "Selenoenzyme Activities in Selenium- and Iodine-deficient Sheep." Biological Trace Element Research, vol. 94, no. 3, 2003, pp. 213-24.
Voudouri AE, Chadio SE, Menegatos JG, et al. Selenoenzyme activities in selenium- and iodine-deficient sheep. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2003;94(3):213-24.
Voudouri, A. E., Chadio, S. E., Menegatos, J. G., Zervas, G. P., Nicol, F., & Arthur, J. R. (2003). Selenoenzyme activities in selenium- and iodine-deficient sheep. Biological Trace Element Research, 94(3), pp. 213-24.
Voudouri AE, et al. Selenoenzyme Activities in Selenium- and Iodine-deficient Sheep. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2003;94(3):213-24. PubMed PMID: 12972689.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Selenoenzyme activities in selenium- and iodine-deficient sheep. AU - Voudouri,Anna E, AU - Chadio,Stella E, AU - Menegatos,John G, AU - Zervas,George P, AU - Nicol,Fergus, AU - Arthur,John R, PY - 2002/10/25/received PY - 2003/01/30/accepted PY - 2003/9/16/pubmed PY - 2004/5/7/medline PY - 2003/9/16/entrez SP - 213 EP - 24 JF - Biological trace element research JO - Biol Trace Elem Res VL - 94 IS - 3 N2 - This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of single and combined deficiencies of selenium and iodine on selenoenzyme activities in sheep. Twenty-four male lambs were assigned to one of four semisynthetic diets: combined deficient A (Se-I), Se-deficient B (Se-I+), I-deficient C (Se+I-), and basal diet D (Se+I+). Thyroid hormones (T3, T4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and inorganic iodine (PII) were determined in plasma. Selenium and glutathione peroxidase activity (GSH-Px) were determined in erythrocytes, and tissue samples, including the thyroid, liver, kidney, and brain, were taken for selenoenzyme analysis. Plasma T3, T4, and TSH concentrations were similar in all groups. Type I deiodinase (ID-I) activity in liver and kidney remained unchanged in Se or I deficiency. In contrast, hepatic ID-I activity was increased by 70% in combined Se-I deficiency. Thyroidal cystolic GSHPx (c-GSH-Px) and phospholipid GSH-Px (ph-GSH-Px) activities remained constant in both Se-deficient groups, whereas thyroidal c-GSH-Px activity increased (57%) in I deficiency. Type II deiodinase (ID-II) activity was not detectable in the cerebrum and cerebellum, whereas cerebellum Type III deiodinase (ID-III) activity was decreased in I deficiency and combined Se-I deficiencies. The results of the present study support a sensitive interaction between Se and I deficiencies in sheep thyroid and brain. Furthermore, the lack of thyroidal ID-I activity, the preservation of the thyroidal antioxidant enzymes, and the increases in hepatic ID-I indicate that a compensatory mechanism(s) works toward retaining plasma T3 levels, mostly by de novo synthesis of T3 and peripheral deiodination of T4 in Se- and I-deficient sheep. SN - 0163-4984 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12972689/Selenoenzyme_activities_in_selenium__and_iodine_deficient_sheep_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1385/BTER:94:3:213 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -