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Effects of avocado as a source of monounsaturated fatty acids on plasma lipid levels.
Arch Med Res. 1992 Winter; 23(4):163-7.AM

Abstract

To examine the effects of avocado on plasma lipid concentrations, a three-diet trial involving 16 healthy volunteers was carried out. A diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids using avocado as their major source (30% of the total energy was consumed as fat: 75% of the total fat from the avocado), with restriction of saturated fats and less than 300 mg of cholesterol per day was evaluated. Subjects also were in a free-diet period with the addition of the same amount of avocado. Finally, volunteers received a low-saturated fat diet without avocado. The first and third diets were designed to simulate a usual diet and volunteers carried on their normal activities during the trial, only the three daily meals were eaten in our clinical unit. Diets lasted 2 weeks and they were assigned in a randomized order. In both rich-monounsaturated fat (RMF) and low-saturated fat (LSF) diets, there were similar reductions in the plasma total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol significantly decreased (p < 0.05) after 2 weeks of the LSF and free monounsaturated-enriched (FME) diets. The plasma triacyglycerol levels lessened after RMF and FME diets, while LSF diet increased them. In total cholesterol and in low-lipoprotein cholesterol levels, there were statistically significant differences between the FME and the LSF diet periods. Avocado is an excellent source of monounsaturated fatty acid in diets designed to avoid hyperlipidemia without the undesirable effects of low-saturated fat diets on HDL-cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Investigación Clínica y Biomédica, Hospital General Dr. Miguel Silva, Morelia, Michoacán, México.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1308699

Citation

Alvizouri-Muñoz, M, et al. "Effects of Avocado as a Source of Monounsaturated Fatty Acids On Plasma Lipid Levels." Archives of Medical Research, vol. 23, no. 4, 1992, pp. 163-7.
Alvizouri-Muñoz M, Carranza-Madrigal J, Herrera-Abarca JE, et al. Effects of avocado as a source of monounsaturated fatty acids on plasma lipid levels. Arch Med Res. 1992;23(4):163-7.
Alvizouri-Muñoz, M., Carranza-Madrigal, J., Herrera-Abarca, J. E., Chávez-Carbajal, F., & Amezcua-Gastelum, J. L. (1992). Effects of avocado as a source of monounsaturated fatty acids on plasma lipid levels. Archives of Medical Research, 23(4), 163-7.
Alvizouri-Muñoz M, et al. Effects of Avocado as a Source of Monounsaturated Fatty Acids On Plasma Lipid Levels. Arch Med Res. 1992;23(4):163-7. PubMed PMID: 1308699.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of avocado as a source of monounsaturated fatty acids on plasma lipid levels. AU - Alvizouri-Muñoz,M, AU - Carranza-Madrigal,J, AU - Herrera-Abarca,J E, AU - Chávez-Carbajal,F, AU - Amezcua-Gastelum,J L, PY - 1992/1/1/pubmed PY - 1992/1/1/medline PY - 1992/1/1/entrez SP - 163 EP - 7 JF - Archives of medical research JO - Arch Med Res VL - 23 IS - 4 N2 - To examine the effects of avocado on plasma lipid concentrations, a three-diet trial involving 16 healthy volunteers was carried out. A diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids using avocado as their major source (30% of the total energy was consumed as fat: 75% of the total fat from the avocado), with restriction of saturated fats and less than 300 mg of cholesterol per day was evaluated. Subjects also were in a free-diet period with the addition of the same amount of avocado. Finally, volunteers received a low-saturated fat diet without avocado. The first and third diets were designed to simulate a usual diet and volunteers carried on their normal activities during the trial, only the three daily meals were eaten in our clinical unit. Diets lasted 2 weeks and they were assigned in a randomized order. In both rich-monounsaturated fat (RMF) and low-saturated fat (LSF) diets, there were similar reductions in the plasma total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol significantly decreased (p < 0.05) after 2 weeks of the LSF and free monounsaturated-enriched (FME) diets. The plasma triacyglycerol levels lessened after RMF and FME diets, while LSF diet increased them. In total cholesterol and in low-lipoprotein cholesterol levels, there were statistically significant differences between the FME and the LSF diet periods. Avocado is an excellent source of monounsaturated fatty acid in diets designed to avoid hyperlipidemia without the undesirable effects of low-saturated fat diets on HDL-cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations. SN - 0188-4409 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1308699/Effects_of_avocado_as_a_source_of_monounsaturated_fatty_acids_on_plasma_lipid_levels_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/dietaryfats.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -