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Chelation therapy to treat lead toxicity in children.
Minn Med. 1992 Nov; 75(11):25-7.MM

Abstract

The most recent Centers for Disease Control guidelines recommend routine screening of children for lead exposure. The CDC recommends close lead-level monitoring of children with lead levels greater than 10 micrograms/dL. The indications for chelation therapy have not changed. Identification and removal of sources of lead exposure are equally as important as chelation therapy. Experimental data have raised concerns about potential central nervous system effects of the most widely used chelating agent, edetate calcium disodium. A newly licensed chelating agent, succimer, appears to have fewer side effects, appears to be more effective, and has the advantage of oral administration. Indications for its use are somewhat limited but may be expanded as experience with its use increases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Children's Hospital, St. Paul.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1331737

Citation

Wegmann, K. "Chelation Therapy to Treat Lead Toxicity in Children." Minnesota Medicine, vol. 75, no. 11, 1992, pp. 25-7.
Wegmann K. Chelation therapy to treat lead toxicity in children. Minn Med. 1992;75(11):25-7.
Wegmann, K. (1992). Chelation therapy to treat lead toxicity in children. Minnesota Medicine, 75(11), 25-7.
Wegmann K. Chelation Therapy to Treat Lead Toxicity in Children. Minn Med. 1992;75(11):25-7. PubMed PMID: 1331737.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chelation therapy to treat lead toxicity in children. A1 - Wegmann,K, PY - 1992/11/1/pubmed PY - 1992/11/1/medline PY - 1992/11/1/entrez SP - 25 EP - 7 JF - Minnesota medicine JO - Minn Med VL - 75 IS - 11 N2 - The most recent Centers for Disease Control guidelines recommend routine screening of children for lead exposure. The CDC recommends close lead-level monitoring of children with lead levels greater than 10 micrograms/dL. The indications for chelation therapy have not changed. Identification and removal of sources of lead exposure are equally as important as chelation therapy. Experimental data have raised concerns about potential central nervous system effects of the most widely used chelating agent, edetate calcium disodium. A newly licensed chelating agent, succimer, appears to have fewer side effects, appears to be more effective, and has the advantage of oral administration. Indications for its use are somewhat limited but may be expanded as experience with its use increases. SN - 0026-556X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1331737/Chelation_therapy_to_treat_lead_toxicity_in_children_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/leadpoisoning.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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