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Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin on sleep EEG and nocturnal hormone secretion in male controls.
Neuroendocrinology. 1992 Oct; 56(4):566-73.N

Abstract

When applied centrally to animals, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) stimulates slow-wave sleep (SWS), whereas somatostatin (SRIF) increases REM sleep. We investigated whether these peptides also affect the sleep EEG in humans when given intravenously by comparing polysomnographically the effects of four boluses of (1) placebo, (2) 50 micrograms GHRH or (3) 50 micrograms SRIF administered at 22.00, 23.00, 24.00 and 1.00 h to 7 male controls. In addition, we collected blood samples through a long catheter every 20 min from 22.00 to 7.00 h and measured plasma cortisol and growth hormone (GH) levels. In comparison with SRIF and placebo, GHRH produced a significant increase in plasma GH concentration throughout the night (mean +/- SD: 10.8 +/- 2.0 ng/ml after GHRH; 3.0 +/- 1.7 ng/ml after SRIF and 3.2 +/- 2.0 ng/ml after placebo). SRIF failed to substantially attenuate the nocturnal GH release. Nocturnal cortisol secretion was blunted after GHRH but remained unaffected by SRIF (61.4 +/- 12.9 ng/ml after placebo; 46.6 +/- 19.7 ng/ml after GHRH and 70.8 +/- 12.6 ng/ml after SRIF). Quantitative sleep EEG staging showed a significant increase in SWS after GHRH administration but no change after SRIF (percent spent in SWS per night: 14.0 +/- 5.6 after placebo, 20.2 +/- 6.6 after GHRH and 15.1 +/- 8.2 after SRIF). Application of SRIF was accompanied by a trend toward increased REM density. The effects of episodic GHRH administration upon SWS, GH and cortisol secretion were opposite to those previously reported for corticotropin-releasing hormone, which supports the view that neuroregulation of human sleep involves an interaction of central GHRH and corticotropin-releasing hormone.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, FRG.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1361964

Citation

Steiger, A, et al. "Effects of Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone and Somatostatin On Sleep EEG and Nocturnal Hormone Secretion in Male Controls." Neuroendocrinology, vol. 56, no. 4, 1992, pp. 566-73.
Steiger A, Guldner J, Hemmeter U, et al. Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin on sleep EEG and nocturnal hormone secretion in male controls. Neuroendocrinology. 1992;56(4):566-73.
Steiger, A., Guldner, J., Hemmeter, U., Rothe, B., Wiedemann, K., & Holsboer, F. (1992). Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin on sleep EEG and nocturnal hormone secretion in male controls. Neuroendocrinology, 56(4), 566-73.
Steiger A, et al. Effects of Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone and Somatostatin On Sleep EEG and Nocturnal Hormone Secretion in Male Controls. Neuroendocrinology. 1992;56(4):566-73. PubMed PMID: 1361964.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin on sleep EEG and nocturnal hormone secretion in male controls. AU - Steiger,A, AU - Guldner,J, AU - Hemmeter,U, AU - Rothe,B, AU - Wiedemann,K, AU - Holsboer,F, PY - 1992/10/1/pubmed PY - 1992/10/1/medline PY - 1992/10/1/entrez SP - 566 EP - 73 JF - Neuroendocrinology JO - Neuroendocrinology VL - 56 IS - 4 N2 - When applied centrally to animals, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) stimulates slow-wave sleep (SWS), whereas somatostatin (SRIF) increases REM sleep. We investigated whether these peptides also affect the sleep EEG in humans when given intravenously by comparing polysomnographically the effects of four boluses of (1) placebo, (2) 50 micrograms GHRH or (3) 50 micrograms SRIF administered at 22.00, 23.00, 24.00 and 1.00 h to 7 male controls. In addition, we collected blood samples through a long catheter every 20 min from 22.00 to 7.00 h and measured plasma cortisol and growth hormone (GH) levels. In comparison with SRIF and placebo, GHRH produced a significant increase in plasma GH concentration throughout the night (mean +/- SD: 10.8 +/- 2.0 ng/ml after GHRH; 3.0 +/- 1.7 ng/ml after SRIF and 3.2 +/- 2.0 ng/ml after placebo). SRIF failed to substantially attenuate the nocturnal GH release. Nocturnal cortisol secretion was blunted after GHRH but remained unaffected by SRIF (61.4 +/- 12.9 ng/ml after placebo; 46.6 +/- 19.7 ng/ml after GHRH and 70.8 +/- 12.6 ng/ml after SRIF). Quantitative sleep EEG staging showed a significant increase in SWS after GHRH administration but no change after SRIF (percent spent in SWS per night: 14.0 +/- 5.6 after placebo, 20.2 +/- 6.6 after GHRH and 15.1 +/- 8.2 after SRIF). Application of SRIF was accompanied by a trend toward increased REM density. The effects of episodic GHRH administration upon SWS, GH and cortisol secretion were opposite to those previously reported for corticotropin-releasing hormone, which supports the view that neuroregulation of human sleep involves an interaction of central GHRH and corticotropin-releasing hormone. SN - 0028-3835 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1361964/Effects_of_growth_hormone_releasing_hormone_and_somatostatin_on_sleep_EEG_and_nocturnal_hormone_secretion_in_male_controls_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000126275 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -