Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Vitamin D status and its relationship with bone mineral density in healthy Asian Indians.
Osteoporos Int. 2004 Jan; 15(1):56-61.OI

Abstract

Synthesis of vitamin D takes place in the skin under the effect of sunlight. The Indian subcontinent is situated between 8.4 degrees N and 37.6 degrees N latitudes and has adequate sunshine throughout the year. Thus, it has been presumed that Indians are vitamin D sufficient. We measured serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] (n=92) and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D [1, 25(OH)(2)D] (n=65) levels in healthy hospital staff, using (125)I radioimmunoassay. Serum intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentration was estimated by immunoradiometric assay. Bone mineral density was estimated using a dual energy X-ray absorptiometer (Hologic QDR 4500A). Using a serum 25(OH)D level of 15 ng/ml as a cutoff, 66.3% (61/92) of the subjects were found to be vitamin D deficient. Of these, 20.6% (19/92) subjects had severe vitamin D deficiency (<5 ng/ml), 27.2% (25/92) had moderate vitamin D deficiency (5-9.9 ng/ml), while 18.5% (17/92) had mild vitamin D deficiency (10-14.9 ng/ml). When a serum 25(OH)D level of 20 ng/ml was used as a cutoff, 78.3% subjects were diagnosed to be vitamin D deficient/insufficient. The serum 1,25(OH)(2)D level was within the normal range (40.6+/-20.1 pg/ml; mean +/- SD). Mean (+/-SD) serum intact PTH, estimated in a limited number of subjects (n=15), was 72.3 (+/-21.0) pg/ml (range 36-100 pg/ml). There was a significant correlation between daily sun exposure and 25(OH)D levels (r=0.731, P<0.001). The serum 25(OH)D level correlated with BMD at the femoral neck and Ward's triangle (r=0.50, P=0.020 and r=0.46, P=0.037, respectively). Our findings show that vitamin D deficiency is common in urban north Indian hospital staff. The possible reasons include inadequate sunlight exposure and skin pigmentation in Indians. The serum 1,25(OH)(2)D level is not a good indicator of vitamin D deficiency. A low serum 25(OH)D level is possibly one of the reasons for lower bone mineral density among Indians.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Endocrinology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rae Bareli Road, 226014, Lucknow, India.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

13680103

Citation

Arya, Vivek, et al. "Vitamin D Status and Its Relationship With Bone Mineral Density in Healthy Asian Indians." Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, vol. 15, no. 1, 2004, pp. 56-61.
Arya V, Bhambri R, Godbole MM, et al. Vitamin D status and its relationship with bone mineral density in healthy Asian Indians. Osteoporos Int. 2004;15(1):56-61.
Arya, V., Bhambri, R., Godbole, M. M., & Mithal, A. (2004). Vitamin D status and its relationship with bone mineral density in healthy Asian Indians. Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, 15(1), 56-61.
Arya V, et al. Vitamin D Status and Its Relationship With Bone Mineral Density in Healthy Asian Indians. Osteoporos Int. 2004;15(1):56-61. PubMed PMID: 13680103.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D status and its relationship with bone mineral density in healthy Asian Indians. AU - Arya,Vivek, AU - Bhambri,Rajiv, AU - Godbole,Madan M, AU - Mithal,Ambrish, Y1 - 2003/09/12/ PY - 2002/09/13/received PY - 2003/07/24/accepted PY - 2003/9/19/pubmed PY - 2004/5/18/medline PY - 2003/9/19/entrez SP - 56 EP - 61 JF - Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA JO - Osteoporos Int VL - 15 IS - 1 N2 - Synthesis of vitamin D takes place in the skin under the effect of sunlight. The Indian subcontinent is situated between 8.4 degrees N and 37.6 degrees N latitudes and has adequate sunshine throughout the year. Thus, it has been presumed that Indians are vitamin D sufficient. We measured serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] (n=92) and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D [1, 25(OH)(2)D] (n=65) levels in healthy hospital staff, using (125)I radioimmunoassay. Serum intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentration was estimated by immunoradiometric assay. Bone mineral density was estimated using a dual energy X-ray absorptiometer (Hologic QDR 4500A). Using a serum 25(OH)D level of 15 ng/ml as a cutoff, 66.3% (61/92) of the subjects were found to be vitamin D deficient. Of these, 20.6% (19/92) subjects had severe vitamin D deficiency (<5 ng/ml), 27.2% (25/92) had moderate vitamin D deficiency (5-9.9 ng/ml), while 18.5% (17/92) had mild vitamin D deficiency (10-14.9 ng/ml). When a serum 25(OH)D level of 20 ng/ml was used as a cutoff, 78.3% subjects were diagnosed to be vitamin D deficient/insufficient. The serum 1,25(OH)(2)D level was within the normal range (40.6+/-20.1 pg/ml; mean +/- SD). Mean (+/-SD) serum intact PTH, estimated in a limited number of subjects (n=15), was 72.3 (+/-21.0) pg/ml (range 36-100 pg/ml). There was a significant correlation between daily sun exposure and 25(OH)D levels (r=0.731, P<0.001). The serum 25(OH)D level correlated with BMD at the femoral neck and Ward's triangle (r=0.50, P=0.020 and r=0.46, P=0.037, respectively). Our findings show that vitamin D deficiency is common in urban north Indian hospital staff. The possible reasons include inadequate sunlight exposure and skin pigmentation in Indians. The serum 1,25(OH)(2)D level is not a good indicator of vitamin D deficiency. A low serum 25(OH)D level is possibly one of the reasons for lower bone mineral density among Indians. SN - 0937-941X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/13680103/Vitamin_D_status_and_its_relationship_with_bone_mineral_density_in_healthy_Asian_Indians_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-003-1491-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -