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Cocaine/polydrug use in pregnancy: two-year follow-up.
Pediatrics. 1992 Feb; 89(2):284-9.Ped

Abstract

The impact of cocaine on pregnancy and neonatal outcome has been well documented over the past few years, but little information regarding long-term outcome of the passively exposed infants has been available. In the present study, the 2-year growth and developmental outcome for three groups of infants is presented: group 1 infants exposed to cocaine and usually marijuana and/or alcohol (n = 106), group 2 infants exposed to marijuana and/or alcohol but no cocaine (n = 45), and group 3 infants exposed to no drugs during pregnancy. All three groups were similar in racial and demographic characteristics and received prenatal care through a comprehensive drug treatment and follow-up program for addicted pregnant women and their infants. The group 1 infants demonstrated significant decreases in birth weight, length, and head circumference, but by a year of age had caught up in mean length and weight compared with control infants. The group 2 infants exhibited only decreased head circumference at birth. Head size in the two drug-exposed groups remained significantly smaller than in control infants through 2 years of age. On the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, mean developmental scores of the two groups of drug-exposed infants did not vary significantly from the control group, although an increased proportion of group 1 and 2 infants scored greater than two standard deviations below the standardized mean score on both the Mental Developmental Index and the Psychomotor Developmental Index compared with the control infants. Cocaine exposure was found to be the single best predictor of head circumference.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1370867

Citation

Chasnoff, I J., et al. "Cocaine/polydrug Use in Pregnancy: Two-year Follow-up." Pediatrics, vol. 89, no. 2, 1992, pp. 284-9.
Chasnoff IJ, Griffith DR, Freier C, et al. Cocaine/polydrug use in pregnancy: two-year follow-up. Pediatrics. 1992;89(2):284-9.
Chasnoff, I. J., Griffith, D. R., Freier, C., & Murray, J. (1992). Cocaine/polydrug use in pregnancy: two-year follow-up. Pediatrics, 89(2), 284-9.
Chasnoff IJ, et al. Cocaine/polydrug Use in Pregnancy: Two-year Follow-up. Pediatrics. 1992;89(2):284-9. PubMed PMID: 1370867.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cocaine/polydrug use in pregnancy: two-year follow-up. AU - Chasnoff,I J, AU - Griffith,D R, AU - Freier,C, AU - Murray,J, PY - 1992/2/1/pubmed PY - 1992/2/1/medline PY - 1992/2/1/entrez SP - 284 EP - 9 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 89 IS - 2 N2 - The impact of cocaine on pregnancy and neonatal outcome has been well documented over the past few years, but little information regarding long-term outcome of the passively exposed infants has been available. In the present study, the 2-year growth and developmental outcome for three groups of infants is presented: group 1 infants exposed to cocaine and usually marijuana and/or alcohol (n = 106), group 2 infants exposed to marijuana and/or alcohol but no cocaine (n = 45), and group 3 infants exposed to no drugs during pregnancy. All three groups were similar in racial and demographic characteristics and received prenatal care through a comprehensive drug treatment and follow-up program for addicted pregnant women and their infants. The group 1 infants demonstrated significant decreases in birth weight, length, and head circumference, but by a year of age had caught up in mean length and weight compared with control infants. The group 2 infants exhibited only decreased head circumference at birth. Head size in the two drug-exposed groups remained significantly smaller than in control infants through 2 years of age. On the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, mean developmental scores of the two groups of drug-exposed infants did not vary significantly from the control group, although an increased proportion of group 1 and 2 infants scored greater than two standard deviations below the standardized mean score on both the Mental Developmental Index and the Psychomotor Developmental Index compared with the control infants. Cocaine exposure was found to be the single best predictor of head circumference.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0031-4005 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1370867/Cocaine/polydrug_use_in_pregnancy:_two_year_follow_up_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=1370867 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -