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Free human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit in gonadal and nongonadal neoplasms.
Cancer Res. 1992 Jul 15; 52(14):3901-7.CR

Abstract

The diagnostic value of elevated human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and its free alpha (hCG alpha) and beta (hCG beta) subunit serum levels as specific tumor markers for nongonadal malignancies is controversial. In the present report, different monoclonal based immunoradiometric assays specific for hCG and its free hCG alpha and hCG beta subunits have been used to reevaluate the presence of these molecules in the serum of patients with a wide variety of tumors. Serum samples from patients with newly diagnosed, persistent, or recurrent malignancies of either known (n = 717) or unknown (n = 32) primary site, healthy blood donors (n = 309), and nonmalignant disease controls (n = 86) were studied using four highly specific and sensitive monoclonal based immunoradiometric assays to hCG and its free subunits. Low level hCG elevations (less than 1000 pg/ml) were found to be common in cancer patients, normal subjects, and disease controls. However, serum levels greater than 1000 pg/ml were highly diagnostic of gonadal tumors and specifically identified nonseminomatous testicular tumors. Significant serum elevations of free hCG alpha subunit (as high as 3000 pg/ml) were found in approximately 96% of cancer patients, normal individuals, and disease controls. In contrast, free hCG beta subunit levels (greater than or equal to 100 pg/ml) were detected in 70 and 50% of patients with nonseminomatous and seminomatous testicular cancers, respectively, and in 47% of bladder, 32% of pancreatic, and 30% of cervical carcinomas. All normal subjects and disease controls had free hCG beta levels less than 100 pg/ml. Thus, the detection of the free hCG beta subunit in serum of nonpregnant subjects was highly diagnostic of malignancy in general and specifically defines a subgroup of aggressive nongonadal malignancies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Molecular Immunology, Institut G. Roussy, Villejuif, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1377600

Citation

Marcillac, I, et al. "Free Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Beta Subunit in Gonadal and Nongonadal Neoplasms." Cancer Research, vol. 52, no. 14, 1992, pp. 3901-7.
Marcillac I, Troalen F, Bidart JM, et al. Free human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit in gonadal and nongonadal neoplasms. Cancer Res. 1992;52(14):3901-7.
Marcillac, I., Troalen, F., Bidart, J. M., Ghillani, P., Ribrag, V., Escudier, B., Malassagne, B., Droz, J. P., Lhommé, C., & Rougier, P. (1992). Free human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit in gonadal and nongonadal neoplasms. Cancer Research, 52(14), 3901-7.
Marcillac I, et al. Free Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Beta Subunit in Gonadal and Nongonadal Neoplasms. Cancer Res. 1992 Jul 15;52(14):3901-7. PubMed PMID: 1377600.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Free human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit in gonadal and nongonadal neoplasms. A1 - Marcillac,I, AU - Troalen,F, AU - Bidart,J M, AU - Ghillani,P, AU - Ribrag,V, AU - Escudier,B, AU - Malassagne,B, AU - Droz,J P, AU - Lhommé,C, AU - Rougier,P, PY - 1992/7/15/pubmed PY - 1992/7/15/medline PY - 1992/7/15/entrez SP - 3901 EP - 7 JF - Cancer research JO - Cancer Res VL - 52 IS - 14 N2 - The diagnostic value of elevated human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and its free alpha (hCG alpha) and beta (hCG beta) subunit serum levels as specific tumor markers for nongonadal malignancies is controversial. In the present report, different monoclonal based immunoradiometric assays specific for hCG and its free hCG alpha and hCG beta subunits have been used to reevaluate the presence of these molecules in the serum of patients with a wide variety of tumors. Serum samples from patients with newly diagnosed, persistent, or recurrent malignancies of either known (n = 717) or unknown (n = 32) primary site, healthy blood donors (n = 309), and nonmalignant disease controls (n = 86) were studied using four highly specific and sensitive monoclonal based immunoradiometric assays to hCG and its free subunits. Low level hCG elevations (less than 1000 pg/ml) were found to be common in cancer patients, normal subjects, and disease controls. However, serum levels greater than 1000 pg/ml were highly diagnostic of gonadal tumors and specifically identified nonseminomatous testicular tumors. Significant serum elevations of free hCG alpha subunit (as high as 3000 pg/ml) were found in approximately 96% of cancer patients, normal individuals, and disease controls. In contrast, free hCG beta subunit levels (greater than or equal to 100 pg/ml) were detected in 70 and 50% of patients with nonseminomatous and seminomatous testicular cancers, respectively, and in 47% of bladder, 32% of pancreatic, and 30% of cervical carcinomas. All normal subjects and disease controls had free hCG beta levels less than 100 pg/ml. Thus, the detection of the free hCG beta subunit in serum of nonpregnant subjects was highly diagnostic of malignancy in general and specifically defines a subgroup of aggressive nongonadal malignancies. SN - 0008-5472 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1377600/Free_human_chorionic_gonadotropin_beta_subunit_in_gonadal_and_nongonadal_neoplasms_ L2 - http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=1377600 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -