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Myocardial protection with carvedilol.
J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 1992; 19 Suppl 1:S138-41.JC

Abstract

Carvedilol is a multiple-action cardiovascular agent that is both a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist and a vasodilator and has recently been made available for the treatment of mild-to-moderate hypertension. Clinical trials are ongoing to establish the efficacy of carvedilol in angina and congestive heart failure. beta-Adrenoceptor antagonists are known to reduce myocardial work secondary to reductions in heart rate and contractility; accordingly, they have been shown to be cardioprotective in animals and in humans. Because carvedilol has beta-adrenoceptor antagonist activity, it also should provide significant cardioprotection. The additional vasodilating activity of carvedilol, which will further reduce myocardial work by decreasing afterload and myocardial wall tension, should provide more salvage of ischemic myocardium than that afforded by a pure beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, such as propranolol. We investigated the ability of carvedilol and propranolol to reduce infarct size in experimental models of acute myocardial infarction in the rat, pig, and dog. The left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 30 (rat) or 45 min (pig) and then reperfused for 24 h (rat) or 4 h (pig). In the dog, the left circumflex coronary artery was occluded for 60 min and reperfused for 24 h. Vehicle, carvedilol, or propranolol was administered intravenously 15 min before ischemia (and, in the rat only, repeated 4 h after ischemia). An additional group of dogs was subjected to permanent left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion for 6 h, and carvedilol or propranolol was given 15 min after occlusion. Infarct size was examined on stained tissue sections using quantitative image analysis.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals p.l.c., King of Prussia, Pennsylvania 19406.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1378142

Citation

Feuerstein, G Z., et al. "Myocardial Protection With Carvedilol." Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, vol. 19 Suppl 1, 1992, pp. S138-41.
Feuerstein GZ, Hamburger SA, Smith EF, et al. Myocardial protection with carvedilol. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 1992;19 Suppl 1:S138-41.
Feuerstein, G. Z., Hamburger, S. A., Smith, E. F., Bril, A., & Ruffolo, R. R. (1992). Myocardial protection with carvedilol. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, 19 Suppl 1, S138-41.
Feuerstein GZ, et al. Myocardial Protection With Carvedilol. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 1992;19 Suppl 1:S138-41. PubMed PMID: 1378142.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Myocardial protection with carvedilol. AU - Feuerstein,G Z, AU - Hamburger,S A, AU - Smith,E F,3rd AU - Bril,A, AU - Ruffolo,R R,Jr PY - 1992/1/11/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1992/1/11/entrez SP - S138 EP - 41 JF - Journal of cardiovascular pharmacology JO - J Cardiovasc Pharmacol VL - 19 Suppl 1 N2 - Carvedilol is a multiple-action cardiovascular agent that is both a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist and a vasodilator and has recently been made available for the treatment of mild-to-moderate hypertension. Clinical trials are ongoing to establish the efficacy of carvedilol in angina and congestive heart failure. beta-Adrenoceptor antagonists are known to reduce myocardial work secondary to reductions in heart rate and contractility; accordingly, they have been shown to be cardioprotective in animals and in humans. Because carvedilol has beta-adrenoceptor antagonist activity, it also should provide significant cardioprotection. The additional vasodilating activity of carvedilol, which will further reduce myocardial work by decreasing afterload and myocardial wall tension, should provide more salvage of ischemic myocardium than that afforded by a pure beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, such as propranolol. We investigated the ability of carvedilol and propranolol to reduce infarct size in experimental models of acute myocardial infarction in the rat, pig, and dog. The left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 30 (rat) or 45 min (pig) and then reperfused for 24 h (rat) or 4 h (pig). In the dog, the left circumflex coronary artery was occluded for 60 min and reperfused for 24 h. Vehicle, carvedilol, or propranolol was administered intravenously 15 min before ischemia (and, in the rat only, repeated 4 h after ischemia). An additional group of dogs was subjected to permanent left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion for 6 h, and carvedilol or propranolol was given 15 min after occlusion. Infarct size was examined on stained tissue sections using quantitative image analysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0160-2446 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1378142/Myocardial_protection_with_carvedilol_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/heartattack.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -