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Alcohol and creative writing.
Psychol Rep. 1992 Oct; 71(2):651-8.PR

Abstract

A repeated-measures design was used to test for the effects of alcohol on creative writing as measured by use of novel figurative language. 11 male social drinkers participated in a creative writing task under two conditions, alcohol (high dose: 1.1 ml. ethanol/kilogram body weight) and placebo. In the alcohol condition, within-subject comparisons indicated significantly greater quantity of creative writing while intoxicated. These results were interpreted as supporting the belief that alcohol can reduce "writer's block," at least amongst nonalcoholic subjects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1410124

Citation

Brunke, M, and M Gilbert. "Alcohol and Creative Writing." Psychological Reports, vol. 71, no. 2, 1992, pp. 651-8.
Brunke M, Gilbert M. Alcohol and creative writing. Psychol Rep. 1992;71(2):651-8.
Brunke, M., & Gilbert, M. (1992). Alcohol and creative writing. Psychological Reports, 71(2), 651-8.
Brunke M, Gilbert M. Alcohol and Creative Writing. Psychol Rep. 1992;71(2):651-8. PubMed PMID: 1410124.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol and creative writing. AU - Brunke,M, AU - Gilbert,M, PY - 1992/10/1/pubmed PY - 1992/10/1/medline PY - 1992/10/1/entrez SP - 651 EP - 8 JF - Psychological reports JO - Psychol Rep VL - 71 IS - 2 N2 - A repeated-measures design was used to test for the effects of alcohol on creative writing as measured by use of novel figurative language. 11 male social drinkers participated in a creative writing task under two conditions, alcohol (high dose: 1.1 ml. ethanol/kilogram body weight) and placebo. In the alcohol condition, within-subject comparisons indicated significantly greater quantity of creative writing while intoxicated. These results were interpreted as supporting the belief that alcohol can reduce "writer's block," at least amongst nonalcoholic subjects. SN - 0033-2941 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1410124/Alcohol_and_creative_writing_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.2466/pr0.1992.71.2.651?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -