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Recent advances in understanding clotting and evaluating patients with recurrent thrombosis.
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1992 Oct; 167(4 Pt 2):1184-91.AJ

Abstract

Significant advances have been made in defining the regulatory mechanisms that control blood clotting. These are reviewed, with special attention to the functions of the natural inhibitors antithrombin III, protein C, and protein S. Congenital deficiencies of these inhibitors as well as acquired abnormalities, such as defective fibrinolysis, and their role in promoting thrombosis are also discussed, as are thrombotic complications of pregnancy. Pregnancy decreases levels of protein S to 40% to 50% of normal levels. The decrease occurs early in pregnancy and persists into the postpartum period; it appears to be a hormonal rather than a dilutional effect. It is not known whether the thrombotic risk associated with pregnancy is increased in women who are congenitally deficient in protein S. Oral contraceptives decrease levels of protein S by about 20%. Women with a personal or family history of thrombosis should be evaluated for predisposing conditions before they start an oral contraceptive, as should women taking oral contraceptives who develop deep venous thrombosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Walter Reed Army Institute, Washington, D.C.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1415444

Citation

Alving, B M., and P C. Comp. "Recent Advances in Understanding Clotting and Evaluating Patients With Recurrent Thrombosis." American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 167, no. 4 Pt 2, 1992, pp. 1184-91.
Alving BM, Comp PC. Recent advances in understanding clotting and evaluating patients with recurrent thrombosis. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1992;167(4 Pt 2):1184-91.
Alving, B. M., & Comp, P. C. (1992). Recent advances in understanding clotting and evaluating patients with recurrent thrombosis. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 167(4 Pt 2), 1184-91.
Alving BM, Comp PC. Recent Advances in Understanding Clotting and Evaluating Patients With Recurrent Thrombosis. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1992;167(4 Pt 2):1184-91. PubMed PMID: 1415444.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Recent advances in understanding clotting and evaluating patients with recurrent thrombosis. AU - Alving,B M, AU - Comp,P C, PY - 1992/10/1/pubmed PY - 1992/10/1/medline PY - 1992/10/1/entrez KW - Behavior KW - Biology KW - Blood Coagulation Effects KW - Blood Proteins KW - Congenital Abnormalities KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Methods--side effects KW - Diseases KW - Embolism KW - Family Planning KW - Fibrinolysis KW - Hematological Effects KW - Hemic System KW - Neonatal Diseases And Abnormalities KW - Oral Contraceptives--side effects KW - Physiology KW - Pregnancy KW - Pregnancy Complications KW - Pulmonary Embolism KW - Reproduction KW - Smoking KW - Thromboembolism KW - Thrombosis KW - Vascular Diseases SP - 1184 EP - 91 JF - American journal of obstetrics and gynecology JO - Am J Obstet Gynecol VL - 167 IS - 4 Pt 2 N2 - Significant advances have been made in defining the regulatory mechanisms that control blood clotting. These are reviewed, with special attention to the functions of the natural inhibitors antithrombin III, protein C, and protein S. Congenital deficiencies of these inhibitors as well as acquired abnormalities, such as defective fibrinolysis, and their role in promoting thrombosis are also discussed, as are thrombotic complications of pregnancy. Pregnancy decreases levels of protein S to 40% to 50% of normal levels. The decrease occurs early in pregnancy and persists into the postpartum period; it appears to be a hormonal rather than a dilutional effect. It is not known whether the thrombotic risk associated with pregnancy is increased in women who are congenitally deficient in protein S. Oral contraceptives decrease levels of protein S by about 20%. Women with a personal or family history of thrombosis should be evaluated for predisposing conditions before they start an oral contraceptive, as should women taking oral contraceptives who develop deep venous thrombosis. SN - 0002-9378 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1415444/Recent_advances_in_understanding_clotting_and_evaluating_patients_with_recurrent_thrombosis_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -