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Travel and ciguatera fish poisoning.
Arch Intern Med. 1992 Oct; 152(10):2049-53.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Ciguatera fish poisoning is a distinctive clinical syndrome associated with the consumption of contaminated marine fish. It is endemic in many popular travel destinations, including the Caribbean and Pacific Islands, where travelers are at risk.

METHODS

Clinical review of 23 patients (60% were travelers) with ciguatera fish poisoning in whom consultation was provided between 1987 and 1990.

RESULTS

Seven patients acquired ciguatera fish poisoning during international travel to the following destinations: Bahamas (n = 4), Dominican Republic (n = 1), British Virgin Islands (n = 1), and United States (n = 1). Suspected fish included grouper, red snapper, and amberjack. Two patients required emergency care, and four patients developed chronic symptoms. Severity was associated with chronicity, duration of peak symptoms, and worsening of symptoms with sexual activity. Chronicity was associated with severity, long latency period, and duration of peak symptoms. The three patients with complete resolution were scuba divers. Amitriptyline was the drug most often providing benefit for chronic symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS

Ciguatera fish poisoning is a health risk to travelers to endemic regions, and their risk likely equals that of indigenous population groups. Barracuda should never be eaten, and travelers should exercise caution when considering other fish dishes, notably, grouper and red snapper.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1417378

Citation

Lange, W R., et al. "Travel and Ciguatera Fish Poisoning." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 152, no. 10, 1992, pp. 2049-53.
Lange WR, Snyder FR, Fudala PJ. Travel and ciguatera fish poisoning. Arch Intern Med. 1992;152(10):2049-53.
Lange, W. R., Snyder, F. R., & Fudala, P. J. (1992). Travel and ciguatera fish poisoning. Archives of Internal Medicine, 152(10), 2049-53.
Lange WR, Snyder FR, Fudala PJ. Travel and Ciguatera Fish Poisoning. Arch Intern Med. 1992;152(10):2049-53. PubMed PMID: 1417378.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Travel and ciguatera fish poisoning. AU - Lange,W R, AU - Snyder,F R, AU - Fudala,P J, PY - 1992/10/1/pubmed PY - 1992/10/1/medline PY - 1992/10/1/entrez SP - 2049 EP - 53 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 152 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Ciguatera fish poisoning is a distinctive clinical syndrome associated with the consumption of contaminated marine fish. It is endemic in many popular travel destinations, including the Caribbean and Pacific Islands, where travelers are at risk. METHODS: Clinical review of 23 patients (60% were travelers) with ciguatera fish poisoning in whom consultation was provided between 1987 and 1990. RESULTS: Seven patients acquired ciguatera fish poisoning during international travel to the following destinations: Bahamas (n = 4), Dominican Republic (n = 1), British Virgin Islands (n = 1), and United States (n = 1). Suspected fish included grouper, red snapper, and amberjack. Two patients required emergency care, and four patients developed chronic symptoms. Severity was associated with chronicity, duration of peak symptoms, and worsening of symptoms with sexual activity. Chronicity was associated with severity, long latency period, and duration of peak symptoms. The three patients with complete resolution were scuba divers. Amitriptyline was the drug most often providing benefit for chronic symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Ciguatera fish poisoning is a health risk to travelers to endemic regions, and their risk likely equals that of indigenous population groups. Barracuda should never be eaten, and travelers should exercise caution when considering other fish dishes, notably, grouper and red snapper. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1417378/Travel_and_ciguatera_fish_poisoning_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/vol/152/pg/2049 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -