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Heat strain during at-sea helicopter operations and the effect of passive microclimate cooling.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1992 Oct; 63(10):881-5.AS

Abstract

Twelve Navy H-3 helicopter aircrew members were monitored (heart rate, skin and rectal temperatures) in both microclimate cooling (ice) vest and non-vest conditions during at-sea operations in the high heat environment of the Persian Gulf. During all flights and flight phases, ambient dry bulb temperatures ranged from 31.0 degrees C (in-flight) to 48.6 degrees C (hover). Heart rate was greatest during hover and on-deck (range: 89.9 to 145.0 beats/min) without an ice vest, yet was significantly reduced with ice (range: 79.7 to 86.0 beats/min) (p less than 0.05). Rectal temperature was not found to be different between vest and non-vest conditions; however, change across flight phases in both conditions was significant (p less than 0.05). Analysis of variance demonstrated significantly lower mean weighted skin temperatures (p less than 0.05) when wearing the ice vest. These data suggest that wearing a protective cooling vest can reduce the heat strain associated with helicopter flight in high heat environments.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Physiological Performance and Operational Medicine Department, Naval Health Research Center, San Diego, CA 92186-5122.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1417650

Citation

Banta, G R., and D E. Braun. "Heat Strain During At-sea Helicopter Operations and the Effect of Passive Microclimate Cooling." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 63, no. 10, 1992, pp. 881-5.
Banta GR, Braun DE. Heat strain during at-sea helicopter operations and the effect of passive microclimate cooling. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1992;63(10):881-5.
Banta, G. R., & Braun, D. E. (1992). Heat strain during at-sea helicopter operations and the effect of passive microclimate cooling. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 63(10), 881-5.
Banta GR, Braun DE. Heat Strain During At-sea Helicopter Operations and the Effect of Passive Microclimate Cooling. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1992;63(10):881-5. PubMed PMID: 1417650.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heat strain during at-sea helicopter operations and the effect of passive microclimate cooling. AU - Banta,G R, AU - Braun,D E, PY - 1992/10/1/pubmed PY - 1992/10/1/medline PY - 1992/10/1/entrez SP - 881 EP - 5 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 63 IS - 10 N2 - Twelve Navy H-3 helicopter aircrew members were monitored (heart rate, skin and rectal temperatures) in both microclimate cooling (ice) vest and non-vest conditions during at-sea operations in the high heat environment of the Persian Gulf. During all flights and flight phases, ambient dry bulb temperatures ranged from 31.0 degrees C (in-flight) to 48.6 degrees C (hover). Heart rate was greatest during hover and on-deck (range: 89.9 to 145.0 beats/min) without an ice vest, yet was significantly reduced with ice (range: 79.7 to 86.0 beats/min) (p less than 0.05). Rectal temperature was not found to be different between vest and non-vest conditions; however, change across flight phases in both conditions was significant (p less than 0.05). Analysis of variance demonstrated significantly lower mean weighted skin temperatures (p less than 0.05) when wearing the ice vest. These data suggest that wearing a protective cooling vest can reduce the heat strain associated with helicopter flight in high heat environments. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1417650/Heat_strain_during_at_sea_helicopter_operations_and_the_effect_of_passive_microclimate_cooling_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/veteransandmilitaryhealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -