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Fluid replacement beverages and maintenance of plasma volume during exercise: role of aldosterone and vasopressin.
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1992; 65(5):445-51.EJ

Abstract

Previous experiments have demonstrated that consumption of a glucose polymer-electrolyte (GP-E) beverage is superior to water in minimizing exercise-induced decreases in plasma volume (PV). We tested the hypothesis that elevated plasma concentrations of vasopressin and/or aldosterone above that seen with water ingestion may explain this observation. Six trained cyclists performed 115 min of constant-load exercise (approximately 65% of maximal oxygen consumption) on a cycle ergometer on two occasions with 7 days separating experiments. Ambient conditions were maintained relatively constant for both exercise tests (29-30 degrees C; 58-66% relative humidity). During each experiment, subjects consumed 400 ml of one of the following beverages 20 min prior to exercise and 275 ml immediately prior to and every 15 min during exercise: (1) distilled water or (2) GP-E drink contents = 7% carbohydrate (glucose polymers and fructose; 9 mmol.l-1 sodium; 5 mmol.l-1 potassium; osmolality 250 mosmol.l-1). No significant difference (P > 0.05) existed in mean skin temperature, rectal temperature, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production or the respiratory exchange ratio between treatments. Further, no significant differences existed in plasma osmolality and plasma concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride or magnesium between treatments. Plasma volume was better maintained (P < 0.05) in the GP-E trial at 90 and 120 min of exercise when compared to the water treatment. No differences existed in plasma levels of vasopressin or aldosterone between treatments at any measurement period. Further, the correlation coefficients between plasma concentrations of vasopressin and aldosterone and change in PV during exercise were 0.42 (P < 0.05) and 0.16 (P > 0.05), respectively.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville 32611.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1425651

Citation

Criswell, D, et al. "Fluid Replacement Beverages and Maintenance of Plasma Volume During Exercise: Role of Aldosterone and Vasopressin." European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, vol. 65, no. 5, 1992, pp. 445-51.
Criswell D, Renshler K, Powers SK, et al. Fluid replacement beverages and maintenance of plasma volume during exercise: role of aldosterone and vasopressin. Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1992;65(5):445-51.
Criswell, D., Renshler, K., Powers, S. K., Tulley, R., Cicale, M., & Wheeler, K. (1992). Fluid replacement beverages and maintenance of plasma volume during exercise: role of aldosterone and vasopressin. European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, 65(5), 445-51.
Criswell D, et al. Fluid Replacement Beverages and Maintenance of Plasma Volume During Exercise: Role of Aldosterone and Vasopressin. Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1992;65(5):445-51. PubMed PMID: 1425651.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fluid replacement beverages and maintenance of plasma volume during exercise: role of aldosterone and vasopressin. AU - Criswell,D, AU - Renshler,K, AU - Powers,S K, AU - Tulley,R, AU - Cicale,M, AU - Wheeler,K, PY - 1992/1/1/pubmed PY - 1992/1/1/medline PY - 1992/1/1/entrez SP - 445 EP - 51 JF - European journal of applied physiology and occupational physiology JO - Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol VL - 65 IS - 5 N2 - Previous experiments have demonstrated that consumption of a glucose polymer-electrolyte (GP-E) beverage is superior to water in minimizing exercise-induced decreases in plasma volume (PV). We tested the hypothesis that elevated plasma concentrations of vasopressin and/or aldosterone above that seen with water ingestion may explain this observation. Six trained cyclists performed 115 min of constant-load exercise (approximately 65% of maximal oxygen consumption) on a cycle ergometer on two occasions with 7 days separating experiments. Ambient conditions were maintained relatively constant for both exercise tests (29-30 degrees C; 58-66% relative humidity). During each experiment, subjects consumed 400 ml of one of the following beverages 20 min prior to exercise and 275 ml immediately prior to and every 15 min during exercise: (1) distilled water or (2) GP-E drink contents = 7% carbohydrate (glucose polymers and fructose; 9 mmol.l-1 sodium; 5 mmol.l-1 potassium; osmolality 250 mosmol.l-1). No significant difference (P > 0.05) existed in mean skin temperature, rectal temperature, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production or the respiratory exchange ratio between treatments. Further, no significant differences existed in plasma osmolality and plasma concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride or magnesium between treatments. Plasma volume was better maintained (P < 0.05) in the GP-E trial at 90 and 120 min of exercise when compared to the water treatment. No differences existed in plasma levels of vasopressin or aldosterone between treatments at any measurement period. Further, the correlation coefficients between plasma concentrations of vasopressin and aldosterone and change in PV during exercise were 0.42 (P < 0.05) and 0.16 (P > 0.05), respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0301-5548 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1425651/Fluid_replacement_beverages_and_maintenance_of_plasma_volume_during_exercise:_role_of_aldosterone_and_vasopressin_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/exerciseandphysicalfitness.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -