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Bone mineral density in children with untreated and treated celiac disease.
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2003; 37(4):434-6JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Osteopenia is a common complication in adults with celiac disease. The effect of a gluten-free diet on bone mineral density is a matter of controversy. The aim of this study was to investigate bone mineral density in children with celiac disease at diagnosis and in patients treated for 1 year.

METHODS

Bone mineral density and bone mineral content were measured in 34 children with untreated celiac disease at diagnosis and in 28 patients on a gluten-free diet for 1 year. The results were compared with those of 64 gender- and age-matched healthy control subjects. Serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25 -hydroxy vitamin D, and intact parathormone levels were determined in treated and untreated patients.

RESULTS

The mean values of bone mineral density and bone mineral content of untreated patients with celiac were significantly lower than the control group (P = 0.006 and P = 0.005, respectively) and treated patients (P = 0.015 and P = 0.011 respectively). Treated patients had mean bone mineral density and bone mineral content values not significantly different from those of healthy control subjects. Minor hypocalcemia was detected in 17.6% of the patients with new diagnoses and 3.6% of the treated patients. Of the untreated patients, 29.4% had high intact parathormone concentrations; in untreated patients, the total was 14.3%. Untreated patients had significantly lower serum calcium and significantly higher intact parathormone levels than did treated patients. The other bone metabolism parameters were similar in the two celiac groups.

CONCLUSION

Children with celiac disease are at risk for reduced bone mineral density. A strict gluten-free diet improves bone mineralization, even in 1 year. Early diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease during childhood will protect the patient from osteoporosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hacettepe University, Department of Pediatrics, Ankara, Turkey.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14508213

Citation

Kavak, Umut S., et al. "Bone Mineral Density in Children With Untreated and Treated Celiac Disease." Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, vol. 37, no. 4, 2003, pp. 434-6.
Kavak US, Yüce A, Koçak N, et al. Bone mineral density in children with untreated and treated celiac disease. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2003;37(4):434-6.
Kavak, U. S., Yüce, A., Koçak, N., Demir, H., Saltik, I. N., Gürakan, F., & Ozen, H. (2003). Bone mineral density in children with untreated and treated celiac disease. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 37(4), pp. 434-6.
Kavak US, et al. Bone Mineral Density in Children With Untreated and Treated Celiac Disease. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2003;37(4):434-6. PubMed PMID: 14508213.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bone mineral density in children with untreated and treated celiac disease. AU - Kavak,Umut S, AU - Yüce,Aysel, AU - Koçak,Nurten, AU - Demir,Hülya, AU - Saltik,Inci Nur, AU - Gürakan,Figen, AU - Ozen,Hasan, PY - 2003/9/26/pubmed PY - 2004/3/19/medline PY - 2003/9/26/entrez SP - 434 EP - 6 JF - Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition JO - J. Pediatr. Gastroenterol. Nutr. VL - 37 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Osteopenia is a common complication in adults with celiac disease. The effect of a gluten-free diet on bone mineral density is a matter of controversy. The aim of this study was to investigate bone mineral density in children with celiac disease at diagnosis and in patients treated for 1 year. METHODS: Bone mineral density and bone mineral content were measured in 34 children with untreated celiac disease at diagnosis and in 28 patients on a gluten-free diet for 1 year. The results were compared with those of 64 gender- and age-matched healthy control subjects. Serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25 -hydroxy vitamin D, and intact parathormone levels were determined in treated and untreated patients. RESULTS: The mean values of bone mineral density and bone mineral content of untreated patients with celiac were significantly lower than the control group (P = 0.006 and P = 0.005, respectively) and treated patients (P = 0.015 and P = 0.011 respectively). Treated patients had mean bone mineral density and bone mineral content values not significantly different from those of healthy control subjects. Minor hypocalcemia was detected in 17.6% of the patients with new diagnoses and 3.6% of the treated patients. Of the untreated patients, 29.4% had high intact parathormone concentrations; in untreated patients, the total was 14.3%. Untreated patients had significantly lower serum calcium and significantly higher intact parathormone levels than did treated patients. The other bone metabolism parameters were similar in the two celiac groups. CONCLUSION: Children with celiac disease are at risk for reduced bone mineral density. A strict gluten-free diet improves bone mineralization, even in 1 year. Early diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease during childhood will protect the patient from osteoporosis. SN - 0277-2116 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14508213/Bone_mineral_density_in_children_with_untreated_and_treated_celiac_disease_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=14508213 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -