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Genetic polymorphisms of estrogen receptor alpha, CYP19, catechol-O-methyltransferase are associated with familial prostate carcinoma risk in a Japanese population.
Cancer. 2003 Oct 01; 98(7):1411-6.C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Estrogen is one of the crucial hormones participating in the proliferation and carcinogenesis of the prostate glands. Genetic polymorphisms in the estrogen metabolism pathway might be involved in the risk of prostate carcinoma development. The authors evaluated the association between genetic polymorphisms in estrogen-related enzymes and receptors and the risk of developing familial prostate carcinoma.

METHODS

In the current study, 101 cases with prostate carcinoma whose first-degree relatives had prostate carcinoma and 114 healthy age and residence-matched male controls were enrolled. The genotypes of estrogen receptor (ER) alpha, aromatase (CYP19), and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genes were analyzed.

RESULTS

For single polymorphisms, a significant association of the T/T genotype of the PvuII site in the ER alpha gene (odds ratio [OR], 3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.97-5.99; P = 0.0028), and the C/T and T/T genotypes of the CYP19 gene (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.02-3.09; P = 0.037) with prostate carcinoma risk, was observed. The G/A genotype of the COMT gene showed a weak tendency toward increased risk (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 0.85-2.57; P = 0.18). Stratification of cases according to clinical stage and pathologic grade showed that the C/T and T/T genotypes of the CYP19 gene were associated significantly with high-grade carcinoma (OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.47-4.46; P = 0.048). The number of high-risk genotypes (the T/T in ER alpha, the C/T and T/T in CYP19, and the G/A in COMT) significantly increased the risk of developing prostate carcinoma (2 genotypes: OR, 3.00; 95% CI, 1.72-5.23; P = 0.008; 3 genotypes: OR, 6.30; 95% CI, 3.61-10.99; P = 0.002).

CONCLUSIONS

Genetic polymorphisms of genes in the estrogen metabolism pathway were associated significantly with familial prostate carcinoma risk. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of low-penetrance genes are targets for understanding the genetic susceptibility of familial prostate carcinoma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, Gunma University School of Medicine, Maebashi, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14508827

Citation

Suzuki, Kazuhiro, et al. "Genetic Polymorphisms of Estrogen Receptor Alpha, CYP19, catechol-O-methyltransferase Are Associated With Familial Prostate Carcinoma Risk in a Japanese Population." Cancer, vol. 98, no. 7, 2003, pp. 1411-6.
Suzuki K, Nakazato H, Matsui H, et al. Genetic polymorphisms of estrogen receptor alpha, CYP19, catechol-O-methyltransferase are associated with familial prostate carcinoma risk in a Japanese population. Cancer. 2003;98(7):1411-6.
Suzuki, K., Nakazato, H., Matsui, H., Koike, H., Okugi, H., Kashiwagi, B., Nishii, M., Ohtake, N., Nakata, S., Ito, K., & Yamanaka, H. (2003). Genetic polymorphisms of estrogen receptor alpha, CYP19, catechol-O-methyltransferase are associated with familial prostate carcinoma risk in a Japanese population. Cancer, 98(7), 1411-6.
Suzuki K, et al. Genetic Polymorphisms of Estrogen Receptor Alpha, CYP19, catechol-O-methyltransferase Are Associated With Familial Prostate Carcinoma Risk in a Japanese Population. Cancer. 2003 Oct 1;98(7):1411-6. PubMed PMID: 14508827.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Genetic polymorphisms of estrogen receptor alpha, CYP19, catechol-O-methyltransferase are associated with familial prostate carcinoma risk in a Japanese population. AU - Suzuki,Kazuhiro, AU - Nakazato,Haruki, AU - Matsui,Hiroshi, AU - Koike,Hidekazu, AU - Okugi,Hironobu, AU - Kashiwagi,Bunzo, AU - Nishii,Masahiro, AU - Ohtake,Nobuaki, AU - Nakata,Seiji, AU - Ito,Kazuto, AU - Yamanaka,Hidetoshi, PY - 2003/9/26/pubmed PY - 2003/10/18/medline PY - 2003/9/26/entrez SP - 1411 EP - 6 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 98 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Estrogen is one of the crucial hormones participating in the proliferation and carcinogenesis of the prostate glands. Genetic polymorphisms in the estrogen metabolism pathway might be involved in the risk of prostate carcinoma development. The authors evaluated the association between genetic polymorphisms in estrogen-related enzymes and receptors and the risk of developing familial prostate carcinoma. METHODS: In the current study, 101 cases with prostate carcinoma whose first-degree relatives had prostate carcinoma and 114 healthy age and residence-matched male controls were enrolled. The genotypes of estrogen receptor (ER) alpha, aromatase (CYP19), and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genes were analyzed. RESULTS: For single polymorphisms, a significant association of the T/T genotype of the PvuII site in the ER alpha gene (odds ratio [OR], 3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.97-5.99; P = 0.0028), and the C/T and T/T genotypes of the CYP19 gene (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.02-3.09; P = 0.037) with prostate carcinoma risk, was observed. The G/A genotype of the COMT gene showed a weak tendency toward increased risk (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 0.85-2.57; P = 0.18). Stratification of cases according to clinical stage and pathologic grade showed that the C/T and T/T genotypes of the CYP19 gene were associated significantly with high-grade carcinoma (OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.47-4.46; P = 0.048). The number of high-risk genotypes (the T/T in ER alpha, the C/T and T/T in CYP19, and the G/A in COMT) significantly increased the risk of developing prostate carcinoma (2 genotypes: OR, 3.00; 95% CI, 1.72-5.23; P = 0.008; 3 genotypes: OR, 6.30; 95% CI, 3.61-10.99; P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Genetic polymorphisms of genes in the estrogen metabolism pathway were associated significantly with familial prostate carcinoma risk. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of low-penetrance genes are targets for understanding the genetic susceptibility of familial prostate carcinoma. SN - 0008-543X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14508827/Genetic_polymorphisms_of_estrogen_receptor_alpha_CYP19_catechol_O_methyltransferase_are_associated_with_familial_prostate_carcinoma_risk_in_a_Japanese_population_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.11639 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -