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Lipids and apolipoproteins change during the progression of chronic renal failure.
Clin Nephrol. 1992 Nov; 38(5):264-70.CN

Abstract

Uremic hyperlipidemia was recently suggested to contribute to progression of chronic renal failure (CRF). To investigate the relationship between lipoprotein abnormalities and decline of renal function, plasma lipids with apoproteins A1, B, E, CII, CIII, CII/CIII and E/CIII ratios, parathyroid hormone (PTH), insulin and glucose levels were examined in 72 patients with different degrees of CRF and compared to 28 patients of a reference group. A significant decrease of CII/CIII ratio was already evident below a Ccr of 60 ml/min, while increased apo-CIII and triglycerides (TG) with reduced HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels occurred below a Ccr of 30 ml/min. Both TG and apo-CIII showed a positive correlation with creatinine levels. On the contrary, apo-CII/apo-CIII and HDL-C inversely correlated with the progression of renal failure. PTH and insulin showed a positive correlation with TG, the former being also inversely related to apo-CII/apo-CIII ratio. Our results point to early apolipoprotein changes in the course of CRF. Elevated apo-CIII and reduced apo-CII/apo-CIII ratio may be considered the most typical features of uremic hyperlipidemia and likely account for the impaired TG removal and the hypertriglyceridemia (HTG). Secondary hyperparathyroidism may contribute to reduce peripheral lipolytic activity and cause HTG. A contributory role of hyperlipidemia in the progression of renal disease is also supported.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept. of Nephrology and Dialysis, Careggi Regional Hospital, Florence, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1451339

Citation

Bergesio, F, et al. "Lipids and Apolipoproteins Change During the Progression of Chronic Renal Failure." Clinical Nephrology, vol. 38, no. 5, 1992, pp. 264-70.
Bergesio F, Monzani G, Ciuti R, et al. Lipids and apolipoproteins change during the progression of chronic renal failure. Clin Nephrol. 1992;38(5):264-70.
Bergesio, F., Monzani, G., Ciuti, R., Serruto, A., Benucci, A., Frizzi, V., & Salvadori, M. (1992). Lipids and apolipoproteins change during the progression of chronic renal failure. Clinical Nephrology, 38(5), 264-70.
Bergesio F, et al. Lipids and Apolipoproteins Change During the Progression of Chronic Renal Failure. Clin Nephrol. 1992;38(5):264-70. PubMed PMID: 1451339.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lipids and apolipoproteins change during the progression of chronic renal failure. AU - Bergesio,F, AU - Monzani,G, AU - Ciuti,R, AU - Serruto,A, AU - Benucci,A, AU - Frizzi,V, AU - Salvadori,M, PY - 1992/11/1/pubmed PY - 1992/11/1/medline PY - 1992/11/1/entrez SP - 264 EP - 70 JF - Clinical nephrology JO - Clin Nephrol VL - 38 IS - 5 N2 - Uremic hyperlipidemia was recently suggested to contribute to progression of chronic renal failure (CRF). To investigate the relationship between lipoprotein abnormalities and decline of renal function, plasma lipids with apoproteins A1, B, E, CII, CIII, CII/CIII and E/CIII ratios, parathyroid hormone (PTH), insulin and glucose levels were examined in 72 patients with different degrees of CRF and compared to 28 patients of a reference group. A significant decrease of CII/CIII ratio was already evident below a Ccr of 60 ml/min, while increased apo-CIII and triglycerides (TG) with reduced HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels occurred below a Ccr of 30 ml/min. Both TG and apo-CIII showed a positive correlation with creatinine levels. On the contrary, apo-CII/apo-CIII and HDL-C inversely correlated with the progression of renal failure. PTH and insulin showed a positive correlation with TG, the former being also inversely related to apo-CII/apo-CIII ratio. Our results point to early apolipoprotein changes in the course of CRF. Elevated apo-CIII and reduced apo-CII/apo-CIII ratio may be considered the most typical features of uremic hyperlipidemia and likely account for the impaired TG removal and the hypertriglyceridemia (HTG). Secondary hyperparathyroidism may contribute to reduce peripheral lipolytic activity and cause HTG. A contributory role of hyperlipidemia in the progression of renal disease is also supported. SN - 0301-0430 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1451339/Lipids_and_apolipoproteins_change_during_the_progression_of_chronic_renal_failure_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/kidneyfailure.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -