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Essential oils from Mediterranean lamiaceae as weed germination inhibitors.
J Agric Food Chem. 2003 Oct 08; 51(21):6158-64.JA

Abstract

The essential oils obtained from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), and savory (Satureja montana L.) and the four monoterpenes that are their major constituents have been analyzed by GC and GC-MS and tested for their allelopathic properties on the seeds of three different annual weeds (Chenopodium album, Portulaca oleracea, and Echinochloa crus-galli) and three crops (Raphanus sativus, Capsicum annuum, and Lactuca sativa), with the aim to evaluate in vitro their potential as germination inhibitors. The essential oil composition varied with the species, thymol being the main constituent (44%) of thyme and carvacrol (57%) that of savory oil. Differences in essential oil composition were observed within two different rosemary ecotypes, type A, with alpha-pinene (37%) and 1,8-cineole (23%), and type B, characterized by a 2-fold content of 1,8-cineole (47%). This latest essential oil inhibited completely the germination of weeds while concurrently displaying little effect on pepper. The other two oils showed less selective action. S. montana essential oil, with 57% carvacrol, is the most active compound, completely inhibiting germination both of crops and weeds. Borneol, one of the main constituents of the oil of rosemary type B, showed an activity comparable to that of the whole oil. Crop and weed seeds treated with 1,8-cineole showed germination values that were not significantly different from controls, even if a slowing of the germination process expressed in terms of a significant increase in mean germination time was observed. Monoterpene compounds also present in the essential oils mainly represented the volatile fraction released from the crops and their residues into the soil.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dipartimento di Agronomia and Gestione dell'Agroecosistema, Università di Pisa, Via S. Michele degli Scalzi 2, 56124 Pisa, Italy. angelini@agr.unipd.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14518938

Citation

Angelini, Luciana G., et al. "Essential Oils From Mediterranean Lamiaceae as Weed Germination Inhibitors." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 51, no. 21, 2003, pp. 6158-64.
Angelini LG, Carpanese G, Cioni PL, et al. Essential oils from Mediterranean lamiaceae as weed germination inhibitors. J Agric Food Chem. 2003;51(21):6158-64.
Angelini, L. G., Carpanese, G., Cioni, P. L., Morelli, I., Macchia, M., & Flamini, G. (2003). Essential oils from Mediterranean lamiaceae as weed germination inhibitors. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51(21), 6158-64.
Angelini LG, et al. Essential Oils From Mediterranean Lamiaceae as Weed Germination Inhibitors. J Agric Food Chem. 2003 Oct 8;51(21):6158-64. PubMed PMID: 14518938.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Essential oils from Mediterranean lamiaceae as weed germination inhibitors. AU - Angelini,Luciana G, AU - Carpanese,Giovanna, AU - Cioni,Pier Luigi, AU - Morelli,Ivano, AU - Macchia,Mario, AU - Flamini,Guido, PY - 2003/10/2/pubmed PY - 2003/11/7/medline PY - 2003/10/2/entrez SP - 6158 EP - 64 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 51 IS - 21 N2 - The essential oils obtained from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), and savory (Satureja montana L.) and the four monoterpenes that are their major constituents have been analyzed by GC and GC-MS and tested for their allelopathic properties on the seeds of three different annual weeds (Chenopodium album, Portulaca oleracea, and Echinochloa crus-galli) and three crops (Raphanus sativus, Capsicum annuum, and Lactuca sativa), with the aim to evaluate in vitro their potential as germination inhibitors. The essential oil composition varied with the species, thymol being the main constituent (44%) of thyme and carvacrol (57%) that of savory oil. Differences in essential oil composition were observed within two different rosemary ecotypes, type A, with alpha-pinene (37%) and 1,8-cineole (23%), and type B, characterized by a 2-fold content of 1,8-cineole (47%). This latest essential oil inhibited completely the germination of weeds while concurrently displaying little effect on pepper. The other two oils showed less selective action. S. montana essential oil, with 57% carvacrol, is the most active compound, completely inhibiting germination both of crops and weeds. Borneol, one of the main constituents of the oil of rosemary type B, showed an activity comparable to that of the whole oil. Crop and weed seeds treated with 1,8-cineole showed germination values that were not significantly different from controls, even if a slowing of the germination process expressed in terms of a significant increase in mean germination time was observed. Monoterpene compounds also present in the essential oils mainly represented the volatile fraction released from the crops and their residues into the soil. SN - 0021-8561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14518938/Essential_oils_from_Mediterranean_lamiaceae_as_weed_germination_inhibitors_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -