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Results of biofeedback therapy for fecal incontinence in children with encopresis and following surgery for anorectal malformations.
Dis Colon Rectum. 2003 Oct; 46(10 Suppl):S54-8.DC

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Some children with fecal incontinence respond to biofeedback therapy. However, whether they can achieve fecal continence posttherapeutically has not been clarified. We studied the serial results of biofeedback therapy and discuss the necessity of providing repeated biofeedback therapy at home.

METHODS

Nineteen children with encopresis underwent one session of biofeedback therapy. Seven of 15 children with fecal incontinence that developed after surgery for anorectal malformations underwent three to eight sessions of biofeedback therapy; the remaining 8 underwent one (mean, 2.9) session only. The patients were hospitalized for one session of biofeedback therapy. To monitor the clinical outcome of intervention, we used serial score assessments from three months to two years posttherapeutically.

RESULTS

Seventeen of 19 (90 percent) patients with encopresis showed clinical improvement after one session of therapy (P < 0.0001). Six months after treatment, however, six of ten (60 percent) patients with encopresis reported recurrent fecal incontinence after one therapeutic session. Clinical improvement was noted in 5 of 15 (33 percent) patients who had fecal incontinence after surgery for anorectal malformations. All five patients showed clinical improvement from six months to two years after several sessions of biofeedback therapy (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Biofeedback therapy is effective in most children with encopresis and in some children with anorectal malformations. However, some patients need repeated sessions of biofeedback therapy to achieve fecal continence. Therefore, a new portable biofeedback apparatus for the treatment of fecal incontinence at home may be helpful.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Surgery, Children's Research Hospital, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14530659

Citation

Hibi, Masahito, et al. "Results of Biofeedback Therapy for Fecal Incontinence in Children With Encopresis and Following Surgery for Anorectal Malformations." Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, vol. 46, no. 10 Suppl, 2003, pp. S54-8.
Hibi M, Iwai N, Kimura O, et al. Results of biofeedback therapy for fecal incontinence in children with encopresis and following surgery for anorectal malformations. Dis Colon Rectum. 2003;46(10 Suppl):S54-8.
Hibi, M., Iwai, N., Kimura, O., Sasaki, Y., & Tsuda, T. (2003). Results of biofeedback therapy for fecal incontinence in children with encopresis and following surgery for anorectal malformations. Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, 46(10 Suppl), S54-8.
Hibi M, et al. Results of Biofeedback Therapy for Fecal Incontinence in Children With Encopresis and Following Surgery for Anorectal Malformations. Dis Colon Rectum. 2003;46(10 Suppl):S54-8. PubMed PMID: 14530659.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Results of biofeedback therapy for fecal incontinence in children with encopresis and following surgery for anorectal malformations. AU - Hibi,Masahito, AU - Iwai,Naomi, AU - Kimura,Osamu, AU - Sasaki,Yasunari, AU - Tsuda,Tomoki, PY - 2003/10/8/pubmed PY - 2003/12/3/medline PY - 2003/10/8/entrez SP - S54 EP - 8 JF - Diseases of the colon and rectum JO - Dis. Colon Rectum VL - 46 IS - 10 Suppl N2 - INTRODUCTION: Some children with fecal incontinence respond to biofeedback therapy. However, whether they can achieve fecal continence posttherapeutically has not been clarified. We studied the serial results of biofeedback therapy and discuss the necessity of providing repeated biofeedback therapy at home. METHODS: Nineteen children with encopresis underwent one session of biofeedback therapy. Seven of 15 children with fecal incontinence that developed after surgery for anorectal malformations underwent three to eight sessions of biofeedback therapy; the remaining 8 underwent one (mean, 2.9) session only. The patients were hospitalized for one session of biofeedback therapy. To monitor the clinical outcome of intervention, we used serial score assessments from three months to two years posttherapeutically. RESULTS: Seventeen of 19 (90 percent) patients with encopresis showed clinical improvement after one session of therapy (P < 0.0001). Six months after treatment, however, six of ten (60 percent) patients with encopresis reported recurrent fecal incontinence after one therapeutic session. Clinical improvement was noted in 5 of 15 (33 percent) patients who had fecal incontinence after surgery for anorectal malformations. All five patients showed clinical improvement from six months to two years after several sessions of biofeedback therapy (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Biofeedback therapy is effective in most children with encopresis and in some children with anorectal malformations. However, some patients need repeated sessions of biofeedback therapy to achieve fecal continence. Therefore, a new portable biofeedback apparatus for the treatment of fecal incontinence at home may be helpful. SN - 0012-3706 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14530659/Results_of_biofeedback_therapy_for_fecal_incontinence_in_children_with_encopresis_and_following_surgery_for_anorectal_malformations_ L2 - http://link.springer.com/article/10.1097/01.DCR.0000087487.41414.A6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -