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Pseudomonas keratitis associated with continuous wear silicone-hydrogel soft contact lens: a case report.
Eye Contact Lens. 2003 Oct; 29(4):255-7.EC

Abstract

PURPOSE

To report a case of Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture-positive microbial keratitis in a patient wearing continuous-wear silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses.

METHODS

A 23-year-old white woman in good health had been wearing silicone hydrogel (lotrafilcon A) soft contact lenses continuously for 26 days when she was examined for a corneal ulcer in her left eye. She had given a history of water jet skiing and diving while wearing her contact lenses. Scrapings of the corneal ulcer were positive for P. aeruginosa, and the patient was treated with fortified topical cefazolin and gentamicin for 1 week and subsequently with topical ciprofloxacin for 2 weeks.

RESULTS

The microbial keratitis resolved with successful treatment. However, the patient had a residual visual deficit secondary to stromal scarring.

CONCLUSIONS

The recently introduced continuous-wear silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses, with their hyper oxygen permeability (Dk), have been shown to overcome hypoxia-associated complications and to have less P. aeruginosa binding to the corneal epithelium. Our case shows that sight-threatening microbial keratitis can still occur even with silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses. Contact lens practitioners should educate patients on the risk of sight-threatening microbial keratitis, the need for patient compliance, and prompt assessment of contact lens-related complaints.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Corneal Service, Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14555905

Citation

Lee, Kelvin Yoon Chiang, and Li Lim. "Pseudomonas Keratitis Associated With Continuous Wear Silicone-hydrogel Soft Contact Lens: a Case Report." Eye & Contact Lens, vol. 29, no. 4, 2003, pp. 255-7.
Lee KY, Lim L. Pseudomonas keratitis associated with continuous wear silicone-hydrogel soft contact lens: a case report. Eye Contact Lens. 2003;29(4):255-7.
Lee, K. Y., & Lim, L. (2003). Pseudomonas keratitis associated with continuous wear silicone-hydrogel soft contact lens: a case report. Eye & Contact Lens, 29(4), 255-7.
Lee KY, Lim L. Pseudomonas Keratitis Associated With Continuous Wear Silicone-hydrogel Soft Contact Lens: a Case Report. Eye Contact Lens. 2003;29(4):255-7. PubMed PMID: 14555905.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pseudomonas keratitis associated with continuous wear silicone-hydrogel soft contact lens: a case report. AU - Lee,Kelvin Yoon Chiang, AU - Lim,Li, PY - 2003/10/14/pubmed PY - 2003/12/10/medline PY - 2003/10/14/entrez SP - 255 EP - 7 JF - Eye & contact lens JO - Eye Contact Lens VL - 29 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: To report a case of Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture-positive microbial keratitis in a patient wearing continuous-wear silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses. METHODS: A 23-year-old white woman in good health had been wearing silicone hydrogel (lotrafilcon A) soft contact lenses continuously for 26 days when she was examined for a corneal ulcer in her left eye. She had given a history of water jet skiing and diving while wearing her contact lenses. Scrapings of the corneal ulcer were positive for P. aeruginosa, and the patient was treated with fortified topical cefazolin and gentamicin for 1 week and subsequently with topical ciprofloxacin for 2 weeks. RESULTS: The microbial keratitis resolved with successful treatment. However, the patient had a residual visual deficit secondary to stromal scarring. CONCLUSIONS: The recently introduced continuous-wear silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses, with their hyper oxygen permeability (Dk), have been shown to overcome hypoxia-associated complications and to have less P. aeruginosa binding to the corneal epithelium. Our case shows that sight-threatening microbial keratitis can still occur even with silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses. Contact lens practitioners should educate patients on the risk of sight-threatening microbial keratitis, the need for patient compliance, and prompt assessment of contact lens-related complaints. SN - 1542-2321 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14555905/Pseudomonas_keratitis_associated_with_continuous_wear_silicone_hydrogel_soft_contact_lens:_a_case_report_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -