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Indoor air pollution from biomass combustion and acute respiratory illness in preschool age children in Zimbabwe.
Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Oct; 32(5):847-53.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Reliance on biomass for cooking and heating exposes many women and young children in developing countries to high levels of air pollution indoors. This study investigated the association between household use of biomass fuels for cooking and acute respiratory infections (ARI) in preschool age children (<5 years) in Zimbabwe.

METHODS

Analysis is based on 3559 children age 0-59 months included in the 1999 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey (ZDHS). Children who suffered from cough accompanied by short, rapid breathing during the 2 weeks preceding the survey were defined as having suffered from ARI. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of suffering from ARI among children from households using biomass fuels (wood, dung, or straw) relative to children from households using cleaner fuels (liquid petroleum gas [LPG]/natural gas, or electricity), after controlling for potentially confounding factors.

RESULTS

About two-thirds (66%) of children lived in households using biomass fuels and 16% suffered from ARI during the 2 weeks preceding the survey interview. After adjusting for child's age, sex, birth order, nutritional status, mother's age at childbirth, education, religion, household living standard, and region of residence, children in households using wood, dung, or straw for cooking were more than twice as likely to have suffered from ARI as children from households using LPG/natural gas or electricity (OR = 2.20; 95% CI: 1.16, 4.19).

CONCLUSIONS

Household use of high pollution biomass fuels is associated with ARI in children in Zimbabwe. The relationship needs to be further investigated using more direct measures of smoke exposure and clinical measures of ARI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Population and Health Studies, East-West Center, 1601 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96848-1601, USA. MishraV@EastWestCenter.Org

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14559763

Citation

Mishra, Vinod. "Indoor Air Pollution From Biomass Combustion and Acute Respiratory Illness in Preschool Age Children in Zimbabwe." International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 32, no. 5, 2003, pp. 847-53.
Mishra V. Indoor air pollution from biomass combustion and acute respiratory illness in preschool age children in Zimbabwe. Int J Epidemiol. 2003;32(5):847-53.
Mishra, V. (2003). Indoor air pollution from biomass combustion and acute respiratory illness in preschool age children in Zimbabwe. International Journal of Epidemiology, 32(5), 847-53.
Mishra V. Indoor Air Pollution From Biomass Combustion and Acute Respiratory Illness in Preschool Age Children in Zimbabwe. Int J Epidemiol. 2003;32(5):847-53. PubMed PMID: 14559763.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Indoor air pollution from biomass combustion and acute respiratory illness in preschool age children in Zimbabwe. A1 - Mishra,Vinod, PY - 2003/10/16/pubmed PY - 2003/12/18/medline PY - 2003/10/16/entrez SP - 847 EP - 53 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 32 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Reliance on biomass for cooking and heating exposes many women and young children in developing countries to high levels of air pollution indoors. This study investigated the association between household use of biomass fuels for cooking and acute respiratory infections (ARI) in preschool age children (<5 years) in Zimbabwe. METHODS: Analysis is based on 3559 children age 0-59 months included in the 1999 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey (ZDHS). Children who suffered from cough accompanied by short, rapid breathing during the 2 weeks preceding the survey were defined as having suffered from ARI. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of suffering from ARI among children from households using biomass fuels (wood, dung, or straw) relative to children from households using cleaner fuels (liquid petroleum gas [LPG]/natural gas, or electricity), after controlling for potentially confounding factors. RESULTS: About two-thirds (66%) of children lived in households using biomass fuels and 16% suffered from ARI during the 2 weeks preceding the survey interview. After adjusting for child's age, sex, birth order, nutritional status, mother's age at childbirth, education, religion, household living standard, and region of residence, children in households using wood, dung, or straw for cooking were more than twice as likely to have suffered from ARI as children from households using LPG/natural gas or electricity (OR = 2.20; 95% CI: 1.16, 4.19). CONCLUSIONS: Household use of high pollution biomass fuels is associated with ARI in children in Zimbabwe. The relationship needs to be further investigated using more direct measures of smoke exposure and clinical measures of ARI. SN - 0300-5771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14559763/Indoor_air_pollution_from_biomass_combustion_and_acute_respiratory_illness_in_preschool_age_children_in_Zimbabwe_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -