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Acetazolamide and furosemide attenuate asthma induced by hyperventilation of cold, dry air.
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992 Dec; 146(6):1518-23.AR

Abstract

We investigated the assumption that the efficacy of inhaled diuretics in asthma is dependent upon inhibition of the Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter. We compared the protective effect of acetazolamide, a diuretic without significant effect on the loop cotransporter, with the protection provided by inhaled furosemide in a cold, dry air hyperventilation model of asthma. Seven asthmatic subjects underwent a baseline bronchial challenge and then received a nebulized dose of 80 mg of furosemide or 500 mg of acetazolamide or saline placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. Repeat challenges were performed immediately and at 2 and 4 h postnebulization. Acetazolamide caused a 47.2% increase in the amount of cold, dry air required to reduce the FEV1, by 20% (expressed in terms of respiratory heat loss as PD20RHL), from 0.79 multiplied or divided by (x/divided by) 1.13 kcal/min (geometric mean x/divided by geometric SEM) at baseline to 1.17 x/divided by 1.09 kcal/min postnebulization (p < 0.025). Furosemide increased the geometric mean PD20RHL by 53.9%, from 0.86 x/divided by 1.12 kcal/min to 1.33 x/divided by 1.12 kcal/min (p < 0.001). There was no significant change after placebo inhalation (0.81 x/divided by 1.15 kcal/min versus 0.87 x/divided by 1.10 kcal/min, NS). Airway responsiveness had returned to baseline by 2 h postnebulization on all 3 days. Furosemide also caused bronchodilatation, producing a 14.1% rise in the mean FEV1 (p < 0.005 versus prenebulization), whereas neither acetazolamide nor placebo altered airway tone significantly.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA 02215.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1456569

Citation

O'Donnell, W J., et al. "Acetazolamide and Furosemide Attenuate Asthma Induced By Hyperventilation of Cold, Dry Air." The American Review of Respiratory Disease, vol. 146, no. 6, 1992, pp. 1518-23.
O'Donnell WJ, Rosenberg M, Niven RW, et al. Acetazolamide and furosemide attenuate asthma induced by hyperventilation of cold, dry air. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992;146(6):1518-23.
O'Donnell, W. J., Rosenberg, M., Niven, R. W., Drazen, J. M., & Israel, E. (1992). Acetazolamide and furosemide attenuate asthma induced by hyperventilation of cold, dry air. The American Review of Respiratory Disease, 146(6), 1518-23.
O'Donnell WJ, et al. Acetazolamide and Furosemide Attenuate Asthma Induced By Hyperventilation of Cold, Dry Air. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992;146(6):1518-23. PubMed PMID: 1456569.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acetazolamide and furosemide attenuate asthma induced by hyperventilation of cold, dry air. AU - O'Donnell,W J, AU - Rosenberg,M, AU - Niven,R W, AU - Drazen,J M, AU - Israel,E, PY - 1992/12/1/pubmed PY - 1992/12/1/medline PY - 1992/12/1/entrez SP - 1518 EP - 23 JF - The American review of respiratory disease JO - Am Rev Respir Dis VL - 146 IS - 6 N2 - We investigated the assumption that the efficacy of inhaled diuretics in asthma is dependent upon inhibition of the Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter. We compared the protective effect of acetazolamide, a diuretic without significant effect on the loop cotransporter, with the protection provided by inhaled furosemide in a cold, dry air hyperventilation model of asthma. Seven asthmatic subjects underwent a baseline bronchial challenge and then received a nebulized dose of 80 mg of furosemide or 500 mg of acetazolamide or saline placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. Repeat challenges were performed immediately and at 2 and 4 h postnebulization. Acetazolamide caused a 47.2% increase in the amount of cold, dry air required to reduce the FEV1, by 20% (expressed in terms of respiratory heat loss as PD20RHL), from 0.79 multiplied or divided by (x/divided by) 1.13 kcal/min (geometric mean x/divided by geometric SEM) at baseline to 1.17 x/divided by 1.09 kcal/min postnebulization (p < 0.025). Furosemide increased the geometric mean PD20RHL by 53.9%, from 0.86 x/divided by 1.12 kcal/min to 1.33 x/divided by 1.12 kcal/min (p < 0.001). There was no significant change after placebo inhalation (0.81 x/divided by 1.15 kcal/min versus 0.87 x/divided by 1.10 kcal/min, NS). Airway responsiveness had returned to baseline by 2 h postnebulization on all 3 days. Furosemide also caused bronchodilatation, producing a 14.1% rise in the mean FEV1 (p < 0.005 versus prenebulization), whereas neither acetazolamide nor placebo altered airway tone significantly.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0003-0805 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1456569/Acetazolamide_and_furosemide_attenuate_asthma_induced_by_hyperventilation_of_cold_dry_air_ L2 - https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/10.1164/ajrccm/146.6.1518?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -