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Fever in the returned traveler.
Am Fam Physician. 2003 Oct 01; 68(7):1343-50.AF

Abstract

With the rising popularity of international travel to exotic locations, family physicians are encountering more febrile patients who recently have visited tropical countries. In the majority of cases, the fever is caused by a common illness such as tracheobronchitis, pneumonia, or urinary tract infection. However, fever in returned travelers always should raise suspicion for a severe or potentially life-threatening tropical infection. In addition to the usual medical history, physicians should obtain a careful travel history, a description of accommodations, information about pretravel immunizations or chemoprophylaxis during travel, a sexual history, and a list of exposures and risk factors. The extent and type of lymphadenopathy are important diagnostic clues. Altered mental status with fever is an alarm symptom and requires urgent evaluation and treatment. Malaria must be considered in patients who traveled even briefly within an endemic area. Enteric fever is treated with fluoroquinolones, dengue fever with supportive measures only, leptospirosis with penicillin or doxycycline, and rickettsial infections with doxycycline.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. vincent.lore@uphs.upenn.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14567489

Citation

Lo Re, Vincent, and Stephen J. Gluckman. "Fever in the Returned Traveler." American Family Physician, vol. 68, no. 7, 2003, pp. 1343-50.
Lo Re V, Gluckman SJ. Fever in the returned traveler. Am Fam Physician. 2003;68(7):1343-50.
Lo Re, V., & Gluckman, S. J. (2003). Fever in the returned traveler. American Family Physician, 68(7), 1343-50.
Lo Re V, Gluckman SJ. Fever in the Returned Traveler. Am Fam Physician. 2003 Oct 1;68(7):1343-50. PubMed PMID: 14567489.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fever in the returned traveler. AU - Lo Re,Vincent,3rd AU - Gluckman,Stephen J, PY - 2003/10/22/pubmed PY - 2003/11/1/medline PY - 2003/10/22/entrez SP - 1343 EP - 50 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 68 IS - 7 N2 - With the rising popularity of international travel to exotic locations, family physicians are encountering more febrile patients who recently have visited tropical countries. In the majority of cases, the fever is caused by a common illness such as tracheobronchitis, pneumonia, or urinary tract infection. However, fever in returned travelers always should raise suspicion for a severe or potentially life-threatening tropical infection. In addition to the usual medical history, physicians should obtain a careful travel history, a description of accommodations, information about pretravel immunizations or chemoprophylaxis during travel, a sexual history, and a list of exposures and risk factors. The extent and type of lymphadenopathy are important diagnostic clues. Altered mental status with fever is an alarm symptom and requires urgent evaluation and treatment. Malaria must be considered in patients who traveled even briefly within an endemic area. Enteric fever is treated with fluoroquinolones, dengue fever with supportive measures only, leptospirosis with penicillin or doxycycline, and rickettsial infections with doxycycline. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14567489/Fever_in_the_returned_traveler_ L2 - https://www.aafp.org/link_out?pmid=14567489 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -