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The relationship between alcohol use and risk of breast cancer by histology and hormone receptor status among women 65-79 years of age.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003 Oct; 12(10):1061-6.CE

Abstract

Alcohol consumption is associated with a moderate increase in breast cancer risk, possibly because alcohol increases estrogen levels in blood. Certain types of breast carcinomas are more hormonally responsive than others, including those that have a lobular histology or are hormone receptor positive, but few studies evaluating alcohol use and breast cancer risk have stratified results by histology or estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) status. We conducted a population-based case-control study of women 65-79 years of age in western Washington State. Women (975) diagnosed with invasive breast cancer during 1997-1999 were compared with 1007 controls. Ever-use of alcohol over the past 20 years was associated with a 1.3-fold [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-1.5] increased risk of breast cancer, although this increase was primarily limited to women who consumed > or =30.0 g/day of alcohol [odds ratio (OR), 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1-2.6]. Differences in risk by histology were observed: ever-use of alcohol was associated with a 1.8-fold (95% CI, 1.3-2.5) increased risk of lobular cancer but only a 1.2-fold (95% CI, 0.9-1.4) increased risk of ductal cancer. Ever-users of alcohol had an increase in risk of ER+/PR+ tumors (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.7), but no change in their risks of ER+/PR- or ER-/PR- tumors. Alcohol use appears to be more strongly associated with risk of lobular carcinomas and hormone receptor-positive tumors than it is with other types of breast cancer. These results are consistent with there being an underlying hormonal basis for the known association between alcohol use and breast cancer incidence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington 98109-1024, USA. cili@fhcrc.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14578143

Citation

Li, Christopher I., et al. "The Relationship Between Alcohol Use and Risk of Breast Cancer By Histology and Hormone Receptor Status Among Women 65-79 Years of Age." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 12, no. 10, 2003, pp. 1061-6.
Li CI, Malone KE, Porter PL, et al. The relationship between alcohol use and risk of breast cancer by histology and hormone receptor status among women 65-79 years of age. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003;12(10):1061-6.
Li, C. I., Malone, K. E., Porter, P. L., Weiss, N. S., Tang, M. T., & Daling, J. R. (2003). The relationship between alcohol use and risk of breast cancer by histology and hormone receptor status among women 65-79 years of age. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 12(10), 1061-6.
Li CI, et al. The Relationship Between Alcohol Use and Risk of Breast Cancer By Histology and Hormone Receptor Status Among Women 65-79 Years of Age. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2003;12(10):1061-6. PubMed PMID: 14578143.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship between alcohol use and risk of breast cancer by histology and hormone receptor status among women 65-79 years of age. AU - Li,Christopher I, AU - Malone,Kathleen E, AU - Porter,Peggy L, AU - Weiss,Noel S, AU - Tang,Mei-Tzu C, AU - Daling,Janet R, PY - 2003/10/28/pubmed PY - 2004/3/23/medline PY - 2003/10/28/entrez SP - 1061 EP - 6 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 12 IS - 10 N2 - Alcohol consumption is associated with a moderate increase in breast cancer risk, possibly because alcohol increases estrogen levels in blood. Certain types of breast carcinomas are more hormonally responsive than others, including those that have a lobular histology or are hormone receptor positive, but few studies evaluating alcohol use and breast cancer risk have stratified results by histology or estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) status. We conducted a population-based case-control study of women 65-79 years of age in western Washington State. Women (975) diagnosed with invasive breast cancer during 1997-1999 were compared with 1007 controls. Ever-use of alcohol over the past 20 years was associated with a 1.3-fold [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-1.5] increased risk of breast cancer, although this increase was primarily limited to women who consumed > or =30.0 g/day of alcohol [odds ratio (OR), 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1-2.6]. Differences in risk by histology were observed: ever-use of alcohol was associated with a 1.8-fold (95% CI, 1.3-2.5) increased risk of lobular cancer but only a 1.2-fold (95% CI, 0.9-1.4) increased risk of ductal cancer. Ever-users of alcohol had an increase in risk of ER+/PR+ tumors (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.7), but no change in their risks of ER+/PR- or ER-/PR- tumors. Alcohol use appears to be more strongly associated with risk of lobular carcinomas and hormone receptor-positive tumors than it is with other types of breast cancer. These results are consistent with there being an underlying hormonal basis for the known association between alcohol use and breast cancer incidence. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14578143/The_relationship_between_alcohol_use_and_risk_of_breast_cancer_by_histology_and_hormone_receptor_status_among_women_65_79_years_of_age_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=14578143 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -