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Smoke-free schools? Results of a secondary school smoking policies survey 2002.
N Z Med J 2003; 116(1180):U560NZ

Abstract

AIM

To describe the cigarette-smoking policies of a sample of New Zealand secondary schools.

METHODS

Schools randomly selected from six geographical regions for participation in the Health Sponsorship Council's 2002 Youth Lifestyle Study (YLS) were invited to also participate in the School Smoking Policies Survey (SSPS).

RESULTS

Eighty one of 82 schools responded (response rate 98.8%); 64 schools (79.0%) provided copies of smoking policies. Of the schools that provided policies, only 31 (50.8%) were totally smoke free, ie, banned smoking 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Five schools (8.2%) were both smoke free and fully compliant with existing legislation. Seventy eight schools (96.3%) provided education about smoking and imposed sanctions on students caught smoking. Most respondents (74.1%) considered school staff would support proposed changes to the Smoke-free Environments Act that would make all school buildings and grounds totally smoke free.

CONCLUSIONS

Most secondary schools are not smoke free, but most staff are likely to support smoke-free status. Existing inconsistency among educational messages, school practice and staff actions may undermine tobacco-smoking-prevention efforts. Proposed strengthening of smoke-free legislation is both timely and necessary to ensure that all New Zealand students are provided with totally smoke-free school environments, consistent with health education messages.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Social and Behavioural Research in Cancer Group, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. hdarling@gandalf.otago.ac.nzNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14581982

Citation

Darling, Helen, and Anthony Reeder. "Smoke-free Schools? Results of a Secondary School Smoking Policies Survey 2002." The New Zealand Medical Journal, vol. 116, no. 1180, 2003, pp. U560.
Darling H, Reeder A. Smoke-free schools? Results of a secondary school smoking policies survey 2002. N Z Med J. 2003;116(1180):U560.
Darling, H., & Reeder, A. (2003). Smoke-free schools? Results of a secondary school smoking policies survey 2002. The New Zealand Medical Journal, 116(1180), pp. U560.
Darling H, Reeder A. Smoke-free Schools? Results of a Secondary School Smoking Policies Survey 2002. N Z Med J. 2003 Aug 22;116(1180):U560. PubMed PMID: 14581982.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoke-free schools? Results of a secondary school smoking policies survey 2002. AU - Darling,Helen, AU - Reeder,Anthony, Y1 - 2003/08/22/ PY - 2003/10/29/pubmed PY - 2003/12/3/medline PY - 2003/10/29/entrez SP - U560 EP - U560 JF - The New Zealand medical journal JO - N. Z. Med. J. VL - 116 IS - 1180 N2 - AIM: To describe the cigarette-smoking policies of a sample of New Zealand secondary schools. METHODS: Schools randomly selected from six geographical regions for participation in the Health Sponsorship Council's 2002 Youth Lifestyle Study (YLS) were invited to also participate in the School Smoking Policies Survey (SSPS). RESULTS: Eighty one of 82 schools responded (response rate 98.8%); 64 schools (79.0%) provided copies of smoking policies. Of the schools that provided policies, only 31 (50.8%) were totally smoke free, ie, banned smoking 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Five schools (8.2%) were both smoke free and fully compliant with existing legislation. Seventy eight schools (96.3%) provided education about smoking and imposed sanctions on students caught smoking. Most respondents (74.1%) considered school staff would support proposed changes to the Smoke-free Environments Act that would make all school buildings and grounds totally smoke free. CONCLUSIONS: Most secondary schools are not smoke free, but most staff are likely to support smoke-free status. Existing inconsistency among educational messages, school practice and staff actions may undermine tobacco-smoking-prevention efforts. Proposed strengthening of smoke-free legislation is both timely and necessary to ensure that all New Zealand students are provided with totally smoke-free school environments, consistent with health education messages. SN - 1175-8716 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14581982/Smoke_free_schools_Results_of_a_secondary_school_smoking_policies_survey_2002_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -