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Naive optics: Predicting and perceiving reflections in mirrors.
J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 2003 Oct; 29(5):982-1002.JE

Abstract

Undergraduate students predicted what would be made visible by a planar mirror. A paper-and-pencil task confirmed previous findings that when approaching a mirror from the side, participants expected to see their reflection in the mirror earlier than they actually would. This early response was found for all mirrors when the observer moved horizontally--even when the mirror was placed on the floor or the ceiling--but not when the observer moved vertically (in a lift). The data support the hypothesis that many people imagine the world in the mirror as rotated around the vertical axis. When participants had to judge manipulated mirror reflections according to their naturalness, a high degree of tolerance was found. In contrast to the prediction task, a rotation around the vertical axis was judged to be less natural than other distortions. The authors conclude that perceptual knowledge and predictive knowledge lead to different patterns of errors. ((c) 2003 APA, all rights reserved)

Authors+Show Affiliations

U Liverpool, Dept of Psychology, Liverpool, United Kingdom. m.bertamini@liverpool.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14585018

Citation

Bertamini, Marco, et al. "Naive Optics: Predicting and Perceiving Reflections in Mirrors." Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance, vol. 29, no. 5, 2003, pp. 982-1002.
Bertamini M, Spooner A, Hecht H. Naive optics: Predicting and perceiving reflections in mirrors. J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 2003;29(5):982-1002.
Bertamini, M., Spooner, A., & Hecht, H. (2003). Naive optics: Predicting and perceiving reflections in mirrors. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance, 29(5), 982-1002.
Bertamini M, Spooner A, Hecht H. Naive Optics: Predicting and Perceiving Reflections in Mirrors. J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 2003;29(5):982-1002. PubMed PMID: 14585018.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Naive optics: Predicting and perceiving reflections in mirrors. AU - Bertamini,Marco, AU - Spooner,Alice, AU - Hecht,Heiko, PY - 2003/10/31/pubmed PY - 2004/4/9/medline PY - 2003/10/31/entrez SP - 982 EP - 1002 JF - Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance JO - J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform VL - 29 IS - 5 N2 - Undergraduate students predicted what would be made visible by a planar mirror. A paper-and-pencil task confirmed previous findings that when approaching a mirror from the side, participants expected to see their reflection in the mirror earlier than they actually would. This early response was found for all mirrors when the observer moved horizontally--even when the mirror was placed on the floor or the ceiling--but not when the observer moved vertically (in a lift). The data support the hypothesis that many people imagine the world in the mirror as rotated around the vertical axis. When participants had to judge manipulated mirror reflections according to their naturalness, a high degree of tolerance was found. In contrast to the prediction task, a rotation around the vertical axis was judged to be less natural than other distortions. The authors conclude that perceptual knowledge and predictive knowledge lead to different patterns of errors. ((c) 2003 APA, all rights reserved) SN - 0096-1523 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14585018/Naive_optics:_Predicting_and_perceiving_reflections_in_mirrors_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/xhp/29/5/982 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -