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Emergency Department patient perceptions of privacy and confidentiality.
J Emerg Med. 2003 Oct; 25(3):329-33.JE

Abstract

The study objective was to determine if Emergency Department (ED) patients experience breaches of privacy and confidentiality during their ED stay and to determine if the type of room in which the patient is placed affects privacy. We surveyed a convenience sample of ED patients at the conclusion of their ED stay regarding their privacy and confidentiality. Overall, 36% of patients overheard conversations with similar frequencies in walled and curtained rooms. The location of conversations overheard varied depending on the type of patient room, as curtained rooms allowed conversations from adjacent rooms to be overheard and walled rooms allowed more conversations from the hallway or nursing station to be overheard. Patients felt more comfortable giving their history and having physical examinations performed in walled vs. curtained rooms. Inappropriate or unprofessional comments by staff were heard by 1.6% of patients. Health care providers in the ED need to be aware of breaches in confidentiality and privacy, as our patients deserve respect of their privacy and confidentiality during their ED visit.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Emergency Medicine, Lutheran General Hospital, 1775 West Dempster Street, Park Ridge, IL 60088, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14585467

Citation

Olsen, Jon C., and Brad R. Sabin. "Emergency Department Patient Perceptions of Privacy and Confidentiality." The Journal of Emergency Medicine, vol. 25, no. 3, 2003, pp. 329-33.
Olsen JC, Sabin BR. Emergency Department patient perceptions of privacy and confidentiality. J Emerg Med. 2003;25(3):329-33.
Olsen, J. C., & Sabin, B. R. (2003). Emergency Department patient perceptions of privacy and confidentiality. The Journal of Emergency Medicine, 25(3), 329-33.
Olsen JC, Sabin BR. Emergency Department Patient Perceptions of Privacy and Confidentiality. J Emerg Med. 2003;25(3):329-33. PubMed PMID: 14585467.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emergency Department patient perceptions of privacy and confidentiality. AU - Olsen,Jon C, AU - Sabin,Brad R, PY - 2003/10/31/pubmed PY - 2004/5/18/medline PY - 2003/10/31/entrez KW - Empirical Approach KW - Professional Patient Relationship SP - 329 EP - 33 JF - The Journal of emergency medicine JO - J Emerg Med VL - 25 IS - 3 N2 - The study objective was to determine if Emergency Department (ED) patients experience breaches of privacy and confidentiality during their ED stay and to determine if the type of room in which the patient is placed affects privacy. We surveyed a convenience sample of ED patients at the conclusion of their ED stay regarding their privacy and confidentiality. Overall, 36% of patients overheard conversations with similar frequencies in walled and curtained rooms. The location of conversations overheard varied depending on the type of patient room, as curtained rooms allowed conversations from adjacent rooms to be overheard and walled rooms allowed more conversations from the hallway or nursing station to be overheard. Patients felt more comfortable giving their history and having physical examinations performed in walled vs. curtained rooms. Inappropriate or unprofessional comments by staff were heard by 1.6% of patients. Health care providers in the ED need to be aware of breaches in confidentiality and privacy, as our patients deserve respect of their privacy and confidentiality during their ED visit. SN - 0736-4679 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14585467/Emergency_Department_patient_perceptions_of_privacy_and_confidentiality_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0736467903002166 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -