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Evidence against the fecal-oral route of transmission for Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood.
Med Sci Monit. 2003 Nov; 9(11):CR489-92.MS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Acquisition of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) occurs mainly in childhood. However, little is known about the mode of transmission. In such developing countries as Turkey, where the hygienic situation facilitates the transmission of hepatitis A virus (HAV), infection with HAV is mainly transmitted via the enteral route. Therefore, it seemed advisable to evaluate the role of fecal-oral transmission in the spread of H. pylori.

MATERIAL/METHODS

Blood samples taken from healthy children (n= 90) 2-16 years old were studied for anti-H. pylori and anti-hepatitis A antibodies by enzyme immunoassay.

RESULTS

Of the 90 children, 33.3% were seropositive for both H. pylori and HAV, 33.3% were seronegative for both, 8.9 % were seropositive for H. pylori only, and 24.4% were seropositive for HAV only. The percentage of seropositive children increased with age for H. pylori and HAV. There was no significant relationship in seroprevalence between H. pylori and HAV when analyzed by logistic regression analysis (p=0.178).

CONCLUSIONS

This study suggests that the seropositivity rates of H. pylori and HAV increase with age, while the fecal-oral route may not be an important mode of transmission for H. pylori in children living in western Anatolia, in the Manisa region.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Infectious Disease, Morris Schinassi Childrens Hospital, Manisa, Turkey.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14586275

Citation

Tosun, Selma Yegane, et al. "Evidence Against the Fecal-oral Route of Transmission for Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Childhood." Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research, vol. 9, no. 11, 2003, pp. CR489-92.
Tosun SY, Kasirga E, Ertan P, et al. Evidence against the fecal-oral route of transmission for Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood. Med Sci Monit. 2003;9(11):CR489-92.
Tosun, S. Y., Kasirga, E., Ertan, P., & Aksu, S. (2003). Evidence against the fecal-oral route of transmission for Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood. Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research, 9(11), CR489-92.
Tosun SY, et al. Evidence Against the Fecal-oral Route of Transmission for Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Childhood. Med Sci Monit. 2003;9(11):CR489-92. PubMed PMID: 14586275.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evidence against the fecal-oral route of transmission for Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood. AU - Tosun,Selma Yegane, AU - Kasirga,Erhun, AU - Ertan,Pelin, AU - Aksu,Selahattin, PY - 2003/10/31/pubmed PY - 2004/2/21/medline PY - 2003/10/31/entrez SP - CR489 EP - 92 JF - Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research JO - Med Sci Monit VL - 9 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Acquisition of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) occurs mainly in childhood. However, little is known about the mode of transmission. In such developing countries as Turkey, where the hygienic situation facilitates the transmission of hepatitis A virus (HAV), infection with HAV is mainly transmitted via the enteral route. Therefore, it seemed advisable to evaluate the role of fecal-oral transmission in the spread of H. pylori. MATERIAL/METHODS: Blood samples taken from healthy children (n= 90) 2-16 years old were studied for anti-H. pylori and anti-hepatitis A antibodies by enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS: Of the 90 children, 33.3% were seropositive for both H. pylori and HAV, 33.3% were seronegative for both, 8.9 % were seropositive for H. pylori only, and 24.4% were seropositive for HAV only. The percentage of seropositive children increased with age for H. pylori and HAV. There was no significant relationship in seroprevalence between H. pylori and HAV when analyzed by logistic regression analysis (p=0.178). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that the seropositivity rates of H. pylori and HAV increase with age, while the fecal-oral route may not be an important mode of transmission for H. pylori in children living in western Anatolia, in the Manisa region. SN - 1234-1010 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14586275/Evidence_against_the_fecal_oral_route_of_transmission_for_Helicobacter_pylori_infection_in_childhood_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -