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Production responses of dairy cows to dietary supplementation with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) during the transition period and early lactation.
J Dairy Sci. 2003 Oct; 86(10):3218-28.JD

Abstract

Holstein cows (n = 30) entering second or greater lactation were fed fat supplements (90 g/d of fatty acids) consisting of Ca salts of either palm fatty acid distillate (control) or a mixture of palm fatty acid distillate and mixed isomers of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, 30.4 g/ d) from 2 wk prepartum through 20 wk postpartum to determine whether CLA would inhibit milk fat synthesis during early lactation and, in turn, affect energy metabolism of dairy cows during the transition period and early lactation. Feeding CLA did not affect DMI or plasma concentrations of glucose, nonesterfied fatty acids, or beta-hydroxbutyrate during the prepartum period and did not affect postpartum DMI. Feeding CLA reduced milk fat content by 12.5% during early lactation; however, cows fed CLA tended to produce approximately 3 kg/d more milk during the first 20 wk of lactation. Feeding CLA tended to decrease the contribution of short- and medium-chain (C < or = 16) fatty acids to milk fat. Changes in milk yield, milk fat content, and milk fatty acid composition were not apparent until after the second week of lactation. Yield of 3.5% fat-corrected milk, milk protein content, milk protein composition, and calculated energy balance were not affected by treatment. Postpartum concentrations of glucose, nonesterfied fatty acids, and beta-hydroxbutyrate in plasma and hepatic content of glycogen and triglycerides were similar between treatments. These data imply that with CLA treatment in early lactation, dairy cows decreased milk fat synthesis and appeared to respond by partitioning more nutrients toward milk synthesis rather than improving net energy balance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14594242

Citation

Bernal-Santos, G, et al. "Production Responses of Dairy Cows to Dietary Supplementation With Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) During the Transition Period and Early Lactation." Journal of Dairy Science, vol. 86, no. 10, 2003, pp. 3218-28.
Bernal-Santos G, Perfield JW, Barbano DM, et al. Production responses of dairy cows to dietary supplementation with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) during the transition period and early lactation. J Dairy Sci. 2003;86(10):3218-28.
Bernal-Santos, G., Perfield, J. W., Barbano, D. M., Bauman, D. E., & Overton, T. R. (2003). Production responses of dairy cows to dietary supplementation with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) during the transition period and early lactation. Journal of Dairy Science, 86(10), 3218-28.
Bernal-Santos G, et al. Production Responses of Dairy Cows to Dietary Supplementation With Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) During the Transition Period and Early Lactation. J Dairy Sci. 2003;86(10):3218-28. PubMed PMID: 14594242.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Production responses of dairy cows to dietary supplementation with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) during the transition period and early lactation. AU - Bernal-Santos,G, AU - Perfield,J W,2nd AU - Barbano,D M, AU - Bauman,D E, AU - Overton,T R, PY - 2003/11/5/pubmed PY - 2003/12/20/medline PY - 2003/11/5/entrez SP - 3218 EP - 28 JF - Journal of dairy science JO - J Dairy Sci VL - 86 IS - 10 N2 - Holstein cows (n = 30) entering second or greater lactation were fed fat supplements (90 g/d of fatty acids) consisting of Ca salts of either palm fatty acid distillate (control) or a mixture of palm fatty acid distillate and mixed isomers of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, 30.4 g/ d) from 2 wk prepartum through 20 wk postpartum to determine whether CLA would inhibit milk fat synthesis during early lactation and, in turn, affect energy metabolism of dairy cows during the transition period and early lactation. Feeding CLA did not affect DMI or plasma concentrations of glucose, nonesterfied fatty acids, or beta-hydroxbutyrate during the prepartum period and did not affect postpartum DMI. Feeding CLA reduced milk fat content by 12.5% during early lactation; however, cows fed CLA tended to produce approximately 3 kg/d more milk during the first 20 wk of lactation. Feeding CLA tended to decrease the contribution of short- and medium-chain (C < or = 16) fatty acids to milk fat. Changes in milk yield, milk fat content, and milk fatty acid composition were not apparent until after the second week of lactation. Yield of 3.5% fat-corrected milk, milk protein content, milk protein composition, and calculated energy balance were not affected by treatment. Postpartum concentrations of glucose, nonesterfied fatty acids, and beta-hydroxbutyrate in plasma and hepatic content of glycogen and triglycerides were similar between treatments. These data imply that with CLA treatment in early lactation, dairy cows decreased milk fat synthesis and appeared to respond by partitioning more nutrients toward milk synthesis rather than improving net energy balance. SN - 0022-0302 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14594242/Production_responses_of_dairy_cows_to_dietary_supplementation_with_conjugated_linoleic_acid__CLA__during_the_transition_period_and_early_lactation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-0302(03)73925-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -