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Physical activity and cancer prevention--data from epidemiologic studies.
Med Sci Sports Exerc 2003; 35(11):1823-7MS

Abstract

PURPOSE

The aim of this paper is to examine whether physical activity plays any role in the prevention of cancer.

METHODS

To accomplish this, data from published epidemiologic studies on the relation between physical activity and the risk of developing cancer were reviewed.

RESULTS

The data are clear in showing that physically active men and women have about a 30-40% reduction in the risk of developing colon cancer, compared with inactive persons. Although the data are sparse, it appears that 30-60 min.d(-1) of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity is needed to decrease risk. There is a dose-response relation, with risk declining further at higher levels of physical activity. It is also clear that physical activity is not associated with the risk of developing rectal cancer. With regard to breast cancer, there is reasonably clear evidence that physically active women have about a 20-30% reduction in risk, compared with inactive women. It also appears that 30-60 min.d(-1) of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity is needed to decrease the risk of breast cancer, and that there is likely a dose-response relation. For prostate cancer, the data are inconsistent regarding whether physical activity plays any role in the prevention of this cancer. There are relatively few studies on physical activity and lung cancer prevention. The available data suggest that physically active individuals have a lower risk of lung cancer; however, it is difficult to completely account for cigarette smoking. There is little information on the role of physical activity in preventing other cancers.

CONCLUSION

Physical activity is associated with lower risk of developing certain site-specific cancers, in particular colon and breast cancers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. ilee@rics.bwh.harvard.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14600545

Citation

Lee, I-Min. "Physical Activity and Cancer Prevention--data From Epidemiologic Studies." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 35, no. 11, 2003, pp. 1823-7.
Lee IM. Physical activity and cancer prevention--data from epidemiologic studies. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003;35(11):1823-7.
Lee, I. M. (2003). Physical activity and cancer prevention--data from epidemiologic studies. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(11), pp. 1823-7.
Lee IM. Physical Activity and Cancer Prevention--data From Epidemiologic Studies. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003;35(11):1823-7. PubMed PMID: 14600545.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physical activity and cancer prevention--data from epidemiologic studies. A1 - Lee,I-Min, PY - 2003/11/6/pubmed PY - 2004/3/12/medline PY - 2003/11/6/entrez SP - 1823 EP - 7 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 35 IS - 11 N2 - PURPOSE: The aim of this paper is to examine whether physical activity plays any role in the prevention of cancer. METHODS: To accomplish this, data from published epidemiologic studies on the relation between physical activity and the risk of developing cancer were reviewed. RESULTS: The data are clear in showing that physically active men and women have about a 30-40% reduction in the risk of developing colon cancer, compared with inactive persons. Although the data are sparse, it appears that 30-60 min.d(-1) of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity is needed to decrease risk. There is a dose-response relation, with risk declining further at higher levels of physical activity. It is also clear that physical activity is not associated with the risk of developing rectal cancer. With regard to breast cancer, there is reasonably clear evidence that physically active women have about a 20-30% reduction in risk, compared with inactive women. It also appears that 30-60 min.d(-1) of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity is needed to decrease the risk of breast cancer, and that there is likely a dose-response relation. For prostate cancer, the data are inconsistent regarding whether physical activity plays any role in the prevention of this cancer. There are relatively few studies on physical activity and lung cancer prevention. The available data suggest that physically active individuals have a lower risk of lung cancer; however, it is difficult to completely account for cigarette smoking. There is little information on the role of physical activity in preventing other cancers. CONCLUSION: Physical activity is associated with lower risk of developing certain site-specific cancers, in particular colon and breast cancers. SN - 0195-9131 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14600545/Physical_activity_and_cancer_prevention__data_from_epidemiologic_studies_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/01.MSS.0000093620.27893.23 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -