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A qualitative study of the acceptability of routine screening of postnatal women using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale.
Br J Gen Pract. 2003 Aug; 53(493):614-9.BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Screening for postnatal depression using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) has been widely recommended and implemented in primary care, although little is known about how acceptable it is to women.

AIM

To explore the acceptability to women of postnatal screening by health visitors with the EPDS.

DESIGN OF STUDY

Qualitative interview study.

SETTING

Postnatal patients from 22 general practices within the area of Oxford City Primary Care Group.

METHOD

Thirty-nine postnatal women from a purposive sample were interviewed, chosen on the basis of different general practices, EPDS results at eight weeks and eight months postnatal, and whether 'listening visits' were received. The interviews were analysed using the constant comparative method.

RESULTS

Just over half of the women interviewed found screening with the EPDS less than acceptable, whatever their postnatal emotional health. The main themes identified were problems with the process of screening and, in particular, the venue, the personal intrusion of screening and stigma. The women interviewed had a clear preference for talking about how they felt, rather than filling out a questionnaire.

CONCLUSION

For this sample, routine screening with the EPDS was less than acceptable for the majority of women. This is of concern, as universal screening with the EPDS for the detection of postnatal depression is already recommended and widespread in primary care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Summertown Health Centre, 160 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 7BS. judy@shake-speare.demon.co.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14601337

Citation

Shakespeare, Judy, et al. "A Qualitative Study of the Acceptability of Routine Screening of Postnatal Women Using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale." The British Journal of General Practice : the Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners, vol. 53, no. 493, 2003, pp. 614-9.
Shakespeare J, Blake F, Garcia J. A qualitative study of the acceptability of routine screening of postnatal women using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Br J Gen Pract. 2003;53(493):614-9.
Shakespeare, J., Blake, F., & Garcia, J. (2003). A qualitative study of the acceptability of routine screening of postnatal women using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. The British Journal of General Practice : the Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners, 53(493), 614-9.
Shakespeare J, Blake F, Garcia J. A Qualitative Study of the Acceptability of Routine Screening of Postnatal Women Using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Br J Gen Pract. 2003;53(493):614-9. PubMed PMID: 14601337.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A qualitative study of the acceptability of routine screening of postnatal women using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. AU - Shakespeare,Judy, AU - Blake,Fiona, AU - Garcia,Jo, PY - 2003/11/7/pubmed PY - 2003/12/3/medline PY - 2003/11/7/entrez SP - 614 EP - 9 JF - The British journal of general practice : the journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners JO - Br J Gen Pract VL - 53 IS - 493 N2 - BACKGROUND: Screening for postnatal depression using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) has been widely recommended and implemented in primary care, although little is known about how acceptable it is to women. AIM: To explore the acceptability to women of postnatal screening by health visitors with the EPDS. DESIGN OF STUDY: Qualitative interview study. SETTING: Postnatal patients from 22 general practices within the area of Oxford City Primary Care Group. METHOD: Thirty-nine postnatal women from a purposive sample were interviewed, chosen on the basis of different general practices, EPDS results at eight weeks and eight months postnatal, and whether 'listening visits' were received. The interviews were analysed using the constant comparative method. RESULTS: Just over half of the women interviewed found screening with the EPDS less than acceptable, whatever their postnatal emotional health. The main themes identified were problems with the process of screening and, in particular, the venue, the personal intrusion of screening and stigma. The women interviewed had a clear preference for talking about how they felt, rather than filling out a questionnaire. CONCLUSION: For this sample, routine screening with the EPDS was less than acceptable for the majority of women. This is of concern, as universal screening with the EPDS for the detection of postnatal depression is already recommended and widespread in primary care. SN - 0960-1643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14601337/A_qualitative_study_of_the_acceptability_of_routine_screening_of_postnatal_women_using_the_Edinburgh_Postnatal_Depression_Scale_ L2 - https://bjgp.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=14601337 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -