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Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus more virulent than methicillin-susceptible S. aureus? A comparative cohort study of British patients with nosocomial infection and bacteremia.
Clin Infect Dis. 2003 Dec 01; 37(11):1453-60.CI

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of hospital-acquired bacteremia. From 1995 through 2000, data on age, sex, patient specialty at time of first bacteremia, primary and secondary sites of infection, delay in initiating antimicrobial therapy, and patient outcome were prospectively recorded for 815 patients with nosocomial S. aureus bacteremia. The proportion of patients whose death was attributable to methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was significantly higher than that for methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) (11.8% vs. 5.1%; odds ratio [OR], 2.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46-4.24; P<.001). After adjustment for host variables, the OR decreased to 1.72 (95% CI, 0.92-3.20; P=.09). There was no significant difference between rates of disseminated infection (7.1% vs. 6.2% for MRSA-infected patients and MSSA-infected patients, respectively; P=.63), though the rate of death due to disseminated infection was significantly higher than death due to uncomplicated infection (37% vs. 10% for MRSA-infected patients [P<.001] and 37% vs. 3% for MSSA-infected patients [P<.001]). There was a strong statistical trend toward death due to nosocomial MRSA infection and bacteremia, compared with MSSA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept. of Microbiology, King George Hospital, Goodmayes, Essex, England. Mark.Melzer@bhr.hospitals.nhs.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14614667

Citation

Melzer, M, et al. "Is Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus More Virulent Than Methicillin-susceptible S. Aureus? a Comparative Cohort Study of British Patients With Nosocomial Infection and Bacteremia." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 37, no. 11, 2003, pp. 1453-60.
Melzer M, Eykyn SJ, Gransden WR, et al. Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus more virulent than methicillin-susceptible S. aureus? A comparative cohort study of British patients with nosocomial infection and bacteremia. Clin Infect Dis. 2003;37(11):1453-60.
Melzer, M., Eykyn, S. J., Gransden, W. R., & Chinn, S. (2003). Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus more virulent than methicillin-susceptible S. aureus? A comparative cohort study of British patients with nosocomial infection and bacteremia. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 37(11), 1453-60.
Melzer M, et al. Is Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus More Virulent Than Methicillin-susceptible S. Aureus? a Comparative Cohort Study of British Patients With Nosocomial Infection and Bacteremia. Clin Infect Dis. 2003 Dec 1;37(11):1453-60. PubMed PMID: 14614667.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus more virulent than methicillin-susceptible S. aureus? A comparative cohort study of British patients with nosocomial infection and bacteremia. AU - Melzer,M, AU - Eykyn,S J, AU - Gransden,W R, AU - Chinn,S, Y1 - 2003/11/06/ PY - 2003/02/14/received PY - 2003/07/23/accepted PY - 2003/11/14/pubmed PY - 2003/12/3/medline PY - 2003/11/14/entrez SP - 1453 EP - 60 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 37 IS - 11 N2 - Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of hospital-acquired bacteremia. From 1995 through 2000, data on age, sex, patient specialty at time of first bacteremia, primary and secondary sites of infection, delay in initiating antimicrobial therapy, and patient outcome were prospectively recorded for 815 patients with nosocomial S. aureus bacteremia. The proportion of patients whose death was attributable to methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was significantly higher than that for methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) (11.8% vs. 5.1%; odds ratio [OR], 2.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46-4.24; P<.001). After adjustment for host variables, the OR decreased to 1.72 (95% CI, 0.92-3.20; P=.09). There was no significant difference between rates of disseminated infection (7.1% vs. 6.2% for MRSA-infected patients and MSSA-infected patients, respectively; P=.63), though the rate of death due to disseminated infection was significantly higher than death due to uncomplicated infection (37% vs. 10% for MRSA-infected patients [P<.001] and 37% vs. 3% for MSSA-infected patients [P<.001]). There was a strong statistical trend toward death due to nosocomial MRSA infection and bacteremia, compared with MSSA. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14614667/Is_methicillin_resistant_Staphylococcus_aureus_more_virulent_than_methicillin_susceptible_S__aureus_A_comparative_cohort_study_of_British_patients_with_nosocomial_infection_and_bacteremia_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/379321 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -