Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Early experiences and attachment relationships of Greek infants raised in residential group care.
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2003 Nov; 44(8):1208-20.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The attachment relationships of infants reared in residential group care from birth, and links between attachment quality and psychosocial development and caregiver sensitivity were studied, with 86 infants reared in group care and 41 infants reared in their own two-parent families who attended day-care centres.

METHODS

Attachment, cognitive development, temperament, and observed social behaviour of the two groups were studied, as was the quality of care by caregivers and mothers.

RESULTS

Sixty-six per cent of infants reared in residential group care showed disorganised attachment to their caregivers, compared with 25% of control infants; 24% of group care infants were securely attached, compared with 41% of control infants. The two groups differed in cognitive development, in temperament and observed social behaviour. Within the residential group care babies, those that were securely attached were observed to express more frequent positive affect and social behaviour, and to initiate more frequent interaction with their caregivers.

CONCLUSIONS

Residential care affected all aspects of the infants' development and was linked to a high rate of disorganised attachment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. zapa@hol.grNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

14626461

Citation

Vorria, Panayiota, et al. "Early Experiences and Attachment Relationships of Greek Infants Raised in Residential Group Care." Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, vol. 44, no. 8, 2003, pp. 1208-20.
Vorria P, Papaligoura Z, Dunn J, et al. Early experiences and attachment relationships of Greek infants raised in residential group care. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2003;44(8):1208-20.
Vorria, P., Papaligoura, Z., Dunn, J., van IJzendoorn, M. H., Steele, H., Kontopoulou, A., & Sarafidou, Y. (2003). Early experiences and attachment relationships of Greek infants raised in residential group care. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, 44(8), 1208-20.
Vorria P, et al. Early Experiences and Attachment Relationships of Greek Infants Raised in Residential Group Care. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2003;44(8):1208-20. PubMed PMID: 14626461.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early experiences and attachment relationships of Greek infants raised in residential group care. AU - Vorria,Panayiota, AU - Papaligoura,Zaira, AU - Dunn,Judy, AU - van IJzendoorn,Marinus H, AU - Steele,Howard, AU - Kontopoulou,Antigoni, AU - Sarafidou,Yiasemi, PY - 2003/11/25/pubmed PY - 2004/4/2/medline PY - 2003/11/25/entrez SP - 1208 EP - 20 JF - Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines JO - J Child Psychol Psychiatry VL - 44 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: The attachment relationships of infants reared in residential group care from birth, and links between attachment quality and psychosocial development and caregiver sensitivity were studied, with 86 infants reared in group care and 41 infants reared in their own two-parent families who attended day-care centres. METHODS: Attachment, cognitive development, temperament, and observed social behaviour of the two groups were studied, as was the quality of care by caregivers and mothers. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of infants reared in residential group care showed disorganised attachment to their caregivers, compared with 25% of control infants; 24% of group care infants were securely attached, compared with 41% of control infants. The two groups differed in cognitive development, in temperament and observed social behaviour. Within the residential group care babies, those that were securely attached were observed to express more frequent positive affect and social behaviour, and to initiate more frequent interaction with their caregivers. CONCLUSIONS: Residential care affected all aspects of the infants' development and was linked to a high rate of disorganised attachment. SN - 0021-9630 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/14626461/Early_experiences_and_attachment_relationships_of_Greek_infants_raised_in_residential_group_care_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0021-9630&date=2003&volume=44&issue=8&spage=1208 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -