Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Control of pertussis in the world.
World Health Stat Q. 1992; 45(2-3):238-47.WH

Abstract

Available data indicate that pertussis remains an important disease during infancy and childhood, particularly among those who are inadequately immunized. Over the past 15 years, successful immunization programmes have been implemented in most countries in the world. Some problems have arisen in the industrialized world where pertussis had been well controlled previously. The underlying causes of these problems are apathy and complacency on the part of physicians and parents, negative attitudes to immunization spread by anti-immunization pressure groups and litigation over liability for alleged vaccine-related injures. In developing countries, immunization coverage with primary series of three doses of DPT vaccine in infants exceeds 80%, but there are considerable differences in coverage rates between regions and between and within countries. Failures to reach and maintain high immunization coverage in developing countries are caused by multiple factors including weak management of immunization services, missing opportunities to immunize eligible children and ineffective information and motivation of mothers to return to complete the immunization series. To effectively control pertussis in the world, all countries should use available pertussis vaccines in immunization programmes for children. Since acellular pertussis vaccines are not generally available, the widespread use of DPT vaccine containing the whole-cell pertussis component should be continued. All efforts should be directed to increase or maintain high immunization coverage with DPT immunization at the level of at least 90% in all districts. Surveillance of pertussis morbidity should be strengthened in all countries and ideally, pertussis should be a reportable disease. More information on the present epidemiological pattern of pertussis, especially age distribution of pertussis cases in developing countries, is needed to develop the policy of booster doses of DPT vaccine in children > 1 year.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Expanded Programme on Immunization, World Health Organization, Geneva.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1462658

Citation

Galazka, A. "Control of Pertussis in the World." World Health Statistics Quarterly. Rapport Trimestriel De Statistiques Sanitaires Mondiales, vol. 45, no. 2-3, 1992, pp. 238-47.
Galazka A. Control of pertussis in the world. World Health Stat Q. 1992;45(2-3):238-47.
Galazka, A. (1992). Control of pertussis in the world. World Health Statistics Quarterly. Rapport Trimestriel De Statistiques Sanitaires Mondiales, 45(2-3), 238-47.
Galazka A. Control of Pertussis in the World. World Health Stat Q. 1992;45(2-3):238-47. PubMed PMID: 1462658.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Control of pertussis in the world. A1 - Galazka,A, PY - 1992/1/1/pubmed PY - 1992/1/1/medline PY - 1992/1/1/entrez KW - Bacterial And Fungal Diseases KW - Child Health KW - Delivery Of Health Care KW - Developed Countries KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Epidemiology KW - Health KW - Health Services KW - Immunization KW - Incidence KW - Infections KW - Measurement KW - Pertussis--prevention and control KW - Primary Health Care KW - Public Health KW - Research Methodology SP - 238 EP - 47 JF - World health statistics quarterly. Rapport trimestriel de statistiques sanitaires mondiales JO - World Health Stat Q VL - 45 IS - 2-3 N2 - Available data indicate that pertussis remains an important disease during infancy and childhood, particularly among those who are inadequately immunized. Over the past 15 years, successful immunization programmes have been implemented in most countries in the world. Some problems have arisen in the industrialized world where pertussis had been well controlled previously. The underlying causes of these problems are apathy and complacency on the part of physicians and parents, negative attitudes to immunization spread by anti-immunization pressure groups and litigation over liability for alleged vaccine-related injures. In developing countries, immunization coverage with primary series of three doses of DPT vaccine in infants exceeds 80%, but there are considerable differences in coverage rates between regions and between and within countries. Failures to reach and maintain high immunization coverage in developing countries are caused by multiple factors including weak management of immunization services, missing opportunities to immunize eligible children and ineffective information and motivation of mothers to return to complete the immunization series. To effectively control pertussis in the world, all countries should use available pertussis vaccines in immunization programmes for children. Since acellular pertussis vaccines are not generally available, the widespread use of DPT vaccine containing the whole-cell pertussis component should be continued. All efforts should be directed to increase or maintain high immunization coverage with DPT immunization at the level of at least 90% in all districts. Surveillance of pertussis morbidity should be strengthened in all countries and ideally, pertussis should be a reportable disease. More information on the present epidemiological pattern of pertussis, especially age distribution of pertussis cases in developing countries, is needed to develop the policy of booster doses of DPT vaccine in children > 1 year. SN - 0379-8070 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1462658/Control_of_pertussis_in_the_world_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/whoopingcough.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -